Florida: Circle B Bar Reserve II

Circling back to Limpkins. I was excited to see these subdued brown and white streaked waterbirds because Florida is its northernmost breeding range. It’s highly uncommon to find them north of southern Georgia and I certainly can’t see them in Oregon.

Structurally related to cranes and named for a perceived limp when they walk, Limpkins are the only surviving species in the genus Aramus and the family Aramidae. They were hunted almost to extinction in the 20th century.

They are no longer listed in Florida (as of January 11, 2017), but are part of the Imperiled Species Management Plan. Populations have improved since protections were enabled, but of course they’re still threatened by what ails most birds today: habitat loss.

They have an unmistakable wailing call that’s even been used in films (jungle sound effects in the Tarzan films, and for the hippogriff  in the film Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkabanz). Hearing their call was almost as good as seeing them. Here’s a recording I took that includes the sound of baby Limpkins begging at the end.

One goal of the trip was to see a Limpkin, and I’d say that was a smashing success.

We had other successes too, including Purple Gallinule.

So pretty! And much more secretive than the Common Gallinule.

Another glistening bird was the Boat-tailed Grackle.

Above our heads were kettles of both Black and Turkey Vultures.

Occasionally we’d spot a Red-Shouldered Hawk.

You know those moments when you’re trying to get a good look at a bird, particularly a warbler in the trees, and you get the feeling it might be something new and different? Usually it turns out to be a Palm Warbler.

But every once in a while, it turns out to be a Northern Parula!

The gray hood, white eye crescents, wing bars, and that bright yellow chest means this is a female Northern Parula. So exciting to find a new warbler. Some day I’d like to meet her handsome male counterpart. Not far from the parula something orange caught my eye. Had to be something good, I knew it.

Indeed! Behind that leaf is a Baltimore Oriole! Another life-bird courtesy of Circle B.

Another goodie we came across was a White-eyed Vireo.

Followed by my lifer Blue-headed Vireo eating a moth snack.

We saw a lot of birds at Circle B and every time we were done for the day we had a difficult time leaving the park. Just one more bird! One day it was impossible to leave because my dad’s car battery died. No, I didn’t sabotage it 😉 but this did mean we could bird for another hour!

This turned out to be a pretty magical hour. First I saw something intriguing sneaking around low in the bushes.

It wasn’t until later that I recognized how awesome this sighting was – my first Painted Bunting! I got such a quick look at the time that I didn’t notice the green sheen on this female bird. I thought it looked like an exotic escapee finch, but it’s actually a lovely wild finch.

Around another corner I noticed a small dove that looked different from the Mourning Doves.

It has a scaly neck, and a pinkish bill with a dark tip, making it a Common Ground Dove. New dove!

Then below the tree I saw a small weird statue.

The statue moved and morphed into an armadillo! Native to southwestern North America, the Nine-banded Armadillo was introduced and expanded its territory to Florida. They’re creepy cute.

It’s a good thing Florida has signs on how to hand this situation. I did not climb the armadillo.

Other birds seen while waiting for AAA:

Pine Warbler; different from Palm Warblers with white wing-bars and a non-wagging tail.

Northern Cardinal

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Prairie Warbler

And a doe-eyed Tufted Titmouse!

Gah! – So cute.

Overall, we saw 63 species at Circle B, 8 of which were life-birds for me, including the Fish Crow that looks identical to American Crows, but says “uh-uh” instead of “caw-caw.” Audio here.

The battery was fixed and it was time for us to leave Circle B Bar Reserve.

Just one more bird.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Florida: Circle B Bar Reserve I

My dad and I birded almost every day on this trip. It’s nice he shares a fondness of feathers. And since last time I left without finding Limpkins, this time he took time scouting parks for potential. He found Circle B Bar Reserve.

Located in Lakeland, FL, the former cattle ranch is over 1200 acres of now protected wildlife reserve home to more than 220 species of birds. Not to mention the alligators, bobcats, armadillos, otters, foxes, insects, reptiles, and 45 butterfly species. It’s part of the East Section of the Great Florida Birding Trail, a 2000-mile collection of protected spaces.

We made three trips to this park in six days and each time we found something new.

It’s glorious. And also a popular destination for photographers (check out the Flickr page).

On our first visit, just a few feet down the trail as I scanned for birds, all of a sudden Limpkins, Limpkins, Limpkins!!!

Not just Limpkins, BABY Limpkins!

I think my exact words were, “OMG baby Limpkins, are you kidding me?”

Limpkins’ main source of food is apple snails, and they are found in abundance here. Florida apple snails are the only native snail, but several invasives have moved in, including the island apple snail, wrecking havoc on wetland crops and the ecosystem, but creating a great food source for Limpkins. They also have the potential to help the endangered Snail Kite (one bird we missed).

Bubblegum or snail eggs?

Where food is plentiful, so are babies. Even in November apparently.

My dad and I watched mama Limpkin break open the apple snail to feed the little Limpkin chick. It was so amazing to watch.

Eventually I pulled myself away from the Limpkins long enough to admire other birds, like plentiful Black-bellied Whistling Ducks.

Including Black-bellied Whistling ducklings. Awwww.

And baby Wood Storks. Awwww?

Wood Storks are great, to feed, they balance one wing out while swirling their feet in the water stirring up good stuff.

So clever.

Another lifer common at the park was the Glossy Ibis.

So glossy

Different from the White-faced Ibis I’ve seen in southeastern Oregon because of its dark iris and pale lines on its face.

Tri-colored Herons coasted by.

Cattle Egrets scarfed down grasshoppers.

And Anhinga juggled fish. Birds here are so talented.

While watching this Anhinga toss fish like pizza dough I looked down and caught a glimpse of movement. Hey!

Sneaky snipe

Wilson’s Snipe! A great spot. It’s important to keep your eyes open, you never know when something will sneak up on you, it could have been this guy.

Hey, I recognize that hump.

We never got a look at its face but I’m pretty sure I heard a low growl rumble from those waters. Check out this video of it crossing the path. So big!

The only thing we saw crossing the trail were tiny birds like this Little Blue Heron.

And a turtle (peninsula cooter?) that stopped for a moment to lay eggs.

The real treat came when we turned around on the trail and something bright yellow caught my eye.

Hello Yellow-throated Warbler! What a beauty. Captivated we followed the busy warbler while it pried leaves open and searched the moss for tiny insects.

A treat for the warbler and a treat for us. This park was so great!

More Circle B birds to come.

Tweets, chirps, and Limpkins,

Audrey

Thanksgiving in Florida: Yard Birds

This year I spent Thanksgiving in Florida visiting family and squeezing in as much birding as possible. Luckily, Florida makes that pretty easy. I visited two years ago and gained a new respect for birds I didn’t appreciate while growing up in the Sunshine State and I was excited to return and find more critters.

Takes specialized training, don’t try this at home

My mom lives in Tampa near the University of South Florida, Lettuce Lake Park, and a small but productive pond right next to the house. She would have a pretty bad-ass 5 mi-radius if she wanted. Two years ago, her yard produced my lifer Black-throated Green Warbler, and this time it gave me a lifer Prairie Warbler!

Blurry, but there’s a bright yellow chest and throat, dark streaks on the sides, olive back yellow eye crescents, and black eye-line. I refound it the next day to try for better photos.

So much better

This bird was tough to get! The best I could manage:

One easy warbler to find is the Palm Warbler.

They’re everywhere with that yellow undertail continually wagging.

Another easy find was Eastern Phoebe always calling “Fee-bee!

And Brown Thrashers, another great southern yard bird.

And of course, the ever ubiquitous, Northern Mockingbird.

I am any bird and all birds

One morning I heard a tussle of raspy high-pitched trills that turned out to be a NOMO street fight.

An Eastern Gray Squirrel and I watched safely from the sidelines.

Cheap seats

Closer to the pond I found a juvenile Little Blue Heron.

Almost all white with a hint of light blue coming in. Makes me wonder what evolutionary advantage having white followed by blue feathers could be? Curious.

Nearby I caught a quick glimpse of one of my favorite birds, the Gray Catbird.

And higher up in the trees were gobs of Blue-gray Gnatcatchers.

It’s funny to think how popular the one gnatcatcher in Portland was, when there are so many here, but that’s the fun of rarities.

Other birds I saw were Common Yellowthroat, Yellow-rumped Warbler, and bubbly House Wren.

Wren of the house

I heard a Carolina Wren singing before I finally spotted it deep in the shrubs.

And I saw another iconic yard bird, the Northern Cardinal.

I happily eye-balled all these birds I haven’t seen in so long, then noticed a bunch of  raucous Blue Jays.

And realized I wasn’t the only one eye-balling them. Cooper’s Hawk!

Fun stuff, I could spend days enjoying the yard birds, but we had to check into the condo on the beach the next day.

Many more Florida birds to come!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey