Summer birding and a Red-headed Woodpecker

Summer birding is going as summer birding does. Slow. I’ve caught up on reading and done some yard work while I wait patiently for fall migration. This time of the year I volunteer with Cascades Pika Watch and visit my favorite talus-tater-friends, the American Pika.

Eeep!

One survey on Larch Mountain gave me a bonus Multnomah County Canada Jay.

Back in my 5-mile-radius I found a Green Heron in the Columbia Slough.

And a few shorebirds have started to trickle in at Broughton Beach. Western and Least Sandpipers have both been spotted on the shores.

Western (L), Least (R)

I finally saw my 5MR Caspian Tern.

And a surprise Bonaparte’s Gull in breeding plumage.

The Bonaparte’s was my 5MR bird #171. A couple of rarities showed up in my radius back in June, including a Great-tailed Grackle at Vanport (first county record?). I’ve wanted to see an GTGR in Oregon for a while now, and unfortunately I want to see a Great-tailed Grackle in Oregon again. The looks were barely diagnostic.

But it was followed by an Ash-throated Flycatcher, a really nice county bird and even better 5MR bird.

There’s been no shortage of baby birds this time of year.

Downy yard baby
Chestnut-backed chick-a-dee
White-crowned nugget
Brewer’s baby

And during one slow period I think I complained there was nothing I could chase that was convenient to my schedule. But then my friend Kayla found a Red-headed Woodpecker (!) on a Friday night. I had nothing planned for Saturday and no excuses. It would be a long drive to a random clear-cut on the Oregon Coast. And an even longer shot the bird would still be in the same place.

Kayla spotted the woodpecker as she and her husband were driving 60 mph along a highway near Reedsport. Two frantic u-turns later she confirmed she had seen a legit Red-headed Woodpecker (fourth Oregon record?). They normally occur east of the Rockies and this bird would be a lifer for me. Once I learned some friends were down for the chase I knew I’d be in good company either way it went so I had to give it a try.

I left early but behind schedule and behind a handful of other birders (including my friends Courtney, Caleb, Nick, and Maureen). I was still 20 minutes away when they texted that Maureen had refound the bird!! I did my best not to floor it and I arrived in time to high-five everyone.

And in time to see the woodpecker!! So dang lucky.

My photos do not do this handsome bird justice. It was much more striking in person.

We spent a little more time walking the highway pointing it out to new arrivals before saying our goodbyes to this awesome bird and continuing along. It was a beautiful day at the coast and I was happy to spend some time there. We went to Siltcoos River Estuary next to look at Snowy Plovers run along the sand and Marbled Murrelets (flying potatoes) over the water. No good photos of either unfortunately.

Then I was alerted to a Gray Catbird sighting at Ona Beach that same morning. It was an hour north and on the way home so it was the obvious next destination. We got to the location (the bushes by the bathroom) and Nick immediately spotted the bird. But sadly no one else could get on it in time so we waited. We ate lunch and waited a little longer entertained by a Swainson’s Thrush carrying food to a nearby nest.

Courtney and Caleb eventually had to take off. And then rest of us finally gave up. I walked back to the parking lot with Nick and Maureen but realized I should use the bathroom before getting back on the road. I hadn’t gotten far back by the restroom when birder Aaron Beerman and his parents waved me over, they’d just seen the catbird!

So I hurried over and didn’t see it. And continued not seeing it for about another 30 min. I gave up for a second (or third? I’ve lost track) time and was set to leave again when another birder, Bill Tice showed up. I told him the story, one person sees the bird then it’s gone for an hour but I figured I’d look with Bill for a few minutes anyways. Not long after we both saw it!!

Or barely saw it? The sneakiest catbird ever. Who knew that Red-headed Woodpeckers were easier to see than Gray Catbirds in Oregon! I’d spent way too much time waiting and finally left to get on the road to get home before dark. Summer birding fun!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Trogon Trip: Paton House

The Paton House deserves its own post. It was started by generous homeowners, Wally and Marion Paton who loved birds and set up feeders, a chalk board for sightings, and invited birders to their yard beginning in 1973. After their passing, the property was picked up by Tucson Audubon to preserve the scenic location as a haven for birds and birders alike. It warms my heart that such a place like this exists.

We made three visits in our five days in Patagonia and we saw 45 species, including lifers for all of us. And we closed the place down each time we went. It was that good.

At the Hummingbird feeders were Anna’s, Broad-billed, and my lifer Violet-crowned Hummingbird.

On the suet in the trees were gobs of Yellow-rumped Warblers,White-breasted Nuthatch, and Ladder-backed Woodpeckers. Sometimes all at once.

On the thistle was an out of season American Goldfinch, Pine Siskin, and Lesser Goldfinch, including one of the “Texas” varieties with much more black on its back.

The seed feeders (surprisingly) attracted Lazuli Buntings.

And one evening, my lifer female Blue Grosbeak shyly came out for a visit.

In the brush piles below were White-crowned Sparrows, Lincoln’s Sparrows, Chipping sparrows, and Rufous-winged Sparrows.

That totally didn’t look like Chipping Sparrows. Nope, not at all.

Gambel’s Quail would call “pup waay pop, pup waay pop” as they scratched around in the dirt and perched on brush piles.

Like clockwork in the evening a female Pyrrhuloxia would cautiously join the other ground feeders for a snack. We spent enough time here to get to know some of the regular birds and their habits.

One time Sarah spotted a pair of Inca Doves near a brush pile, they are so tiny, they made the White-winged Doves look like behemoths.

In the skies above Max spotted (his and Sarah’s lifer!) a Gray Hawk circling above. (I’d seen one once before in Texas).

And on our last day, with no other expected life birds on the horizon, Max left to get something out of the car then came running back to alert Sarah and I because he thought he’d seen a Zone-tailed Hawk mixed in with the Turkey Vultures in the sky! Sure enough!

Totally not a Turkey Vulture

Life bird for all of us! It was a very lucky sighting. And a very lovely time at Paton House.

Thank you Wally and Marion.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

SoCal: Death Valley

Our final destination on this trip was Death Valley. I had no idea what to expect. I’d driven through a portion of the valley a decade ago but didn’t remember how mountainous it actually is.

Temps during our stay were in the high 70s at day and low 50s at night. It was perfect.

The first night we stayed at Furnace Creek Campground located next to the Death Valley Visitor Center and the Oasis at Death Valley (formerly known as Furnace Creek Resort). There’s an expensive inn, an economy hotel and a few private RV campgrounds in the area including Fiddler’s Campground that had live music (karaoke and sometimes yodeling) after dark that could be heard from our campsite a block away.

Bat!

Bats made up for the lack of ambiance. I knew camping here would be a challenge but this lush green “oasis” is where many birds drop down during migration.

Amid festivals, a parade, construction, general business and a constant stream of cars and people around me I made the most of it and birded like I do. Luckily the birds didn’t seem to mind the chaos. The first evening I found a pair of Canada Geese on the golf course, because of course they would be there even in the desert.

Per the Birder’s Guide to SoCal the golf course is private property and birders are not welcome while others “commit golf.” So I followed the rules and birded from the fringes.

Though some were less obedient.

Golf course face-off

Par 4 Say’s Phoebe

From aerial photos (and per some eBird reports) I could see ponds on the property, but I couldn’t find a way to access them without trespassing. I got pretty close but ran into a dead end of thorny shrubs and had to backtrack a couple of miles. Not my finest hour. But I did find a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (not black-tailed since it has more white under the tail).

And a Verdin.

I ran out of time (energy and water) to find another way in. The best waterbird besides the geese was a flyover Mallard.

Good job desert-duck

The book mentions to look for White-winged doves calling from the Tamarisks or, “lately, Eurasian Collared Doves.” I could only find Eurasian-collared Doves and there are sparse eBird reports of White-winged on the property in recent years and none from 2018.

Shocking

The grounds had a few good sparrow spots. I found House, Savannah, Golden-crowned, White-crowned, weird looking Song Sparrows.

And lots of Lincoln Sparrows.

One lucky afternoon I picked out a (Red) Fox Sparrow in the heat waves.

It was interesting to see birds’ strategies for keeping cool. Most stayed in the shade.

Shady House Sparrows

Some panted, or splashed in puddles or took dust baths. I saw some blackbirds drinking from sprinklers at the visitor center and I found a pair of Great-tailed Grackles taking shade under cars in the parking lot.

The best parking lot bird was a Harris’s Sparrow! A rare bird for the area.

I “pished” for a brief moment and it immediately popped out on a close shrub.

Too close

Amazing! I found a variety of Icterids too, including Brewer’s Blackbird, Red-winged Blackbird, Brown-headed Cowbird, and the best surprise was Western Meadowlark.

In the shade of trees above there was a Cooper’s Hawk.

I had a couple of falcon fly-bys a Peregrine and a Prairie.

We had perfect weather until almost the last day when a windstorm blew through the valley. It wouldn’t be Death Valley if it didn’t try to kill us. The windstorm then turned into a sandstorm. Terrible for birding or doing anything outside.

Leaving the storm

Luckily we had the van for shelter, and this was also the day we drove to a smaller campground at higher elevation called Wildrose. It was less sandy here, but still very windy.

From the safety of the van I spotted Black-throated Sparrows on the hillsides.

We drove a little ways past the campground towards the charcoal kilns but the road conditions turned too bumpy so we turned around. On the way back we pulled over for a Horned Lark that hopped right up next to the van.

And we had distant looks at a Golden Eagle!

Back at the campsite I walked the road down to a small creek and found a Ladder-backed Woodpecker.

American Robin photobomb

A Bewick’s Wren.

And a Fox Sparrow scratching in the leaves.

As the sun was setting (at 4pm) and as I walked back to the campground I felt good about how birdy Death Valley was but I was also a little sad I hadn’t seen the poster-bird, a Greater Roadrunner, when just at that moment one walked right out in front of me. It raised its tail up and slowly lowered it down then continued down the road.

It was the perfect ending.

I have to say, writing about our trip I can’t help but think about the recent fires in California. It’s heartbreaking news. I’ve made a donation to the San Francisco SPCA for their disaster relief efforts to save animals affected by the fires. Much love to everyone in the state, they’ve been through a lot.

XOXO and happy holidays,

Audrey