Deschutes Birding

A short while ago on a sunny day before the rains came back, Tomas and I decided to play hooky from work and head east. He to bike the Deschutes River Railbed Trail and me to work on some county birding. I had exactly 7 species in Wasco, and 2 in neighboring Sherman County just east across the Deschutes River.

I explored Deschutes River State Rec Area first which is where I saw my first army of adorable goslings.

With protective parents not far behind.

I mostly explored by car because I was still booted up and couldn’t hike (or walk) well. But that didn’t stop me from dragging myself up a trail following an intriguing birdsong that turned out to be an Orange-crowned Warbler. Birds will be my reason for walking again.

On the way down a Bushtit caught my eye.

This is when I learned there are two subspecies of Bushtits: “Interior” and “Pacific.” I’m used to seeing Pacific at my suet feeder, that are all gray puffballs. Interior are gray puffballs with blushing brown cheeks. Didn’t think they could get cuter.

Safe on flat ground and back at the park I found White-crowned Sparrows, Savannah Sparrows, and a single Lincoln’s Sparrow. In the tree-tops were Yellow-rumped Warblers, and dozens of bright American Goldfinch.

I then hopped over to Wasco County to check out Celilo Park that offers free camping that seems to appeal mostly to local fishermen. The problem with campgrounds along I-84 is that they’re along I-84. It’s noisy, and occasionally trains blow through screaming the horn. Not ideal for camping or birding, but I made do.

The best birds were a pair of Western Kingbirds.

And a Yellow Warbler! – that did not appreciate my wanting to take its photo.

Just before it zipped down to the Columbia River water’s edge and flew off. It was hotter at this point, birds were quieting down and I had little time before I had to meet Tomas back by the trailhead.

Head-wave dust bath

Back at Deschutes SP I found a Hammond’s Flycatcher (long primary projection, vest, small dark bill, short tail).

And surprisingly, three more Western Kingbirds!

I ended up adding 42 species between the two counties. I thought 5 Western Kingbirds in one day was a lot, but Wasco County would teach me a lesson about kingbirds later.

Tomas made it back, sweaty and accomplished after 40 miles with just three flats (watch out for that puncturevine). We drove back to Portland after stopping at Pfriem  (pronounced freem) Brewery in Hood River where the beer is so good you’ll leave your credit cards there. No regrets!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Bonus zono

I birded so efficiently at the coast it left me ample time the next day to look for a rare Harris’s Sparrow. It was a first-year bird found by James Cook along Sundial Loop Trail near the Troutdale Airport.

It’d been a while since I birded this hotspot. My first trip in the spring of 2015 I biked there and saw my first Rufous Hummingbird and found a Great Horned Owl nest. That was a good day.

I checked on that nest again and sadly this time, no owls.

This morning it was dark and rainy but I was hopeful anyways. I came across two birders on the trail that I’ve met before and we reintroduced ourselves. Dena Turner and Mary Ratcliff and I then continued along, looking for “zonos” birder slang for Zonotrichia, the genus of five American sparrows included in the Emberizidae family; White-crowned Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow, Golden-crowned Sparrow, Rufous-collared Sparrow, and Harris’s Sparrow (Zonotrichia querula).

Zonotrichia is from Greek origin, zone “band” and thrix, trikhos, “hair.”

Golden-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla)

I could see that.

Querula is Latin for “plaintive” or “complaining” in reference to the Harris’s song.  And while we’re going there, Harris’s Sparrow is named after Edward Harris (1799-1863), (not the actor), but ornithologist and friend of Jonn James Audubon.

Unfortunately, the morning resulted in zero zonos. But we did see some Lesser Goldfinch or maybe call them “spins,” short for Spinus?

Of course as soon as I got home, someone reported the Harris’s Sparrow. *face-palm* And at this point, Tomas had taken the car to go mountain biking. What was a good birder to do? Since it was my last chance before the work week started again and I’d have no time to bird, I grabbed a Car2Go rental and headed back. It was only a 20-minute drive from my house, and I figured, I’ve spent more on a bird before. Justified.

Within minutes of exiting the car, I saw my friend, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher Bill and another birder on site, and moments later I was on the bird.

Zono friend!

The Harris’s Sparrow hopped to the ground to munch on seeds that someone put out for the birds (thanks for that!).

Two other zonos were present, White-crowned Sparrow (no photos), and Golden-Crowned Sparrows.

I got a glimpse overhead of a Pileated Woodpecker that I’d only heard earlier.

And every once in a while a California Scrub-Jay would drop in and stir up all ground-feeders.

Dark-eyed Juncos scattered.

Spotted Towhees didn’t care much.

And eventually the handsome Harris’s would come back.

He was an ambassador for wildlife after all.

I was so glad I’d gone back! It was worth every penny.

Tweets and zonos,

Audrey

Seattle to Malheur to Astoria II

I stayed two nights in the historic Frenchglen Hotel. Established in 1916, the hotel has interesting history and rustic charm. The rooms are small and the bathrooms shared, but I was most excited for the family dining experience. I’m not usually into family dining, but in this setting I found it delightful and charming.

Dinner is promptly served at 6:30pm and consisted of tasty local fare followed by apple cobbler for dessert. While grazing, Tomas and I chatted with another Portland couple visiting in a similar fashion to us, but the best part was listening to stories from the retired couple at the opposite end of the table about their encounters earlier in the day with wild horses and burrowing owls. I listened carefully.

And the next morning when Tomas set off for his bike tour over Steens Mountain, I set off in search of owls.

Love that guy

The plan was Tomas would bike tour for a week while I birded the surrounding area so I could also provide a pick-up if needed. Best of both worlds. We set off and though I tried hard, searching the shrubs along gravel roads, checking multiple sites, I failed to find any owls.

But I did find Golden Eagles.

It was neat to see the different variations, the one on the left with white patches under the wings and tail is a juvenile. I pulled over at another stop and saw four (!) perched on a power pole in the far distance. See terrible photo evidence (note the American Kestrel perched on the juniper to the right):

One big happy family

While driving around I spooked several birds along the roadsides, occasionally finding a cooperative one or two perched on barbed wire.

Sage Thrashers

Western Meadowlark

Brewer’s Sparrow

Vesper Sparrow

And waiting to strike, Loggerhead Shrike.

It was exciting to get roadside views of pronghorn.

Butt, butt, pronghorn

Classic eastern Oregon.

And not far away, hopeful coyote.

After too many hours of driving, I returned to Frenchglen and discovered the P Ranch historic area of Malheur. Named after Peter French, a nineteenth century rancher, the P ranch is now a part of Malheur National Wildlife. Old structures, barns, fields, and paths along the Donner und Blitzen River, it was really pretty and I spent some time poking around and finding a few birds including:

Yellow-breasted Chat

Song Sparrow

Yellow Warbler

White-crowned Sparrow

Being in Malheur, I really wanted to find something exotic. Because Maheur, right? I got pretty excited when I saw this weirdo bird.

It took me a while to realize it was just an American Goldfinch in transition to non-breeding plumage. Then another point I got excited when I saw something I thought looked grouse-like in a field.

Not until I got home and studied the photo when I realized it must be an American Kestrel in a chicken suit. Strike two. Birding is hard.

Lets look at deer instead.

Better. At least I recognized one bird.

Bank Swallow! Hanging on the wire next to with a bunch of Barn Swallows and the moon.

As it got dark, Common Nighthawks flew by peenting along the way as I made my way back to the hotel room for the last night. In the morning, I would head to Steens Mountain to see what I could find.

Good nights and chirps,

Audrey