Tabor Times Two

Mt Tabor Park is the gift that keeps on giving. All that stuff about balance and taking it easy? The cake is a lie. One afternoon this week reports of a Blue-headed Vireo and Common Poorwill proved too irresistible. The day was sunny and full of possibility. But first I had to leave my yard, and I was delayed by a flurry of bird activity.

Three years (and 5 days) ago I had my first Blurry-rocket-smudge Wilson’s Warbler in the yard, and this April I had another!

Only moderately better focus but with more leaves.

Then I heard singing.

Ignore that label, and ignore the robin that chimes in at the 7 second mark. Because I heard what I thought was a Hutton’s Vireo, after seeing this bird.

Based on those dark feet, the eye-ring and bill, but as it turns out, this is an outlier Ruby-crowned Kinglet that lacks the yellow feet. But what it does have is the dark bar under the white wing bar that a Hutton’s Vireo never has.

The clincher

Then I found this terrible but diagnostic photo in the mix.

That prominent eye-ring, combined with the singing, this is a Cassin’s Vireo! A yard first almost mis-identified as another yard first. There’s still so much to learn.

But did you see the eagle?

Yes, yes I did. Then it was off to Tabor!

I looked for the vireo in the designated spot, then wandered around to undesignated spots, wondering where “the Cove” is? Not a vireo to be found anywhere. I realized it’s a little mad following a tiny migrating bird in a big park, but I thought there might be other fun distractions in the vicinity. Indeed there was.

I heard jays, robins, juncos, sparrows, siskins, flickers, all alarming over a ridge and I hurried over. I thought it had to be an owl (or a Gyrfalcon). I looked but didn’t find anything. Then I looked closer.

No freakin way!! A Northern Saw-whet Owl!! Not the owl I was expecting, but such a great surprise. The hummingbirds dive-bombed it, robins called loudly, as it tried to look invisible. I had a spectacular view of its backside from the flat part of the trail.

Such a great consolation prize, I was rejuvenated to stay and listen for a potential poorwill. It was still early, so I drove around to the other side of the park. When, again, I heard something intriguing uptrail. Where have I heard that shrieking sound before?

Oh yes, Great Horned Owl-ets!

At least there was all that if I missed the poorwill, but there was still time. At around 8:00pm I waited as the skies darkened and fewer and fewer people exercised past me. The reports had the bird at around 8:30 so I turned on my phone recorder then. Just in case. It was somewhat creepy but also peaceful waiting in the dark. And then at 8:42pm I heard it!

A soft, single, but unmistakeable, “poor-will”. I waited another 15 minutes but didn’t hear another peep. I left hoping I’d gotten something usable and couldn’t wait so on the way home in the car I blasted the recording and thought I heard something, that was finally confirmed once I got home.

The bird was first heard by Tom McNamara while he was walking his dog at the park. There are only two other records of a Common Poorwill at Tabor, one by the Hinkles in September 2010 and another by Chris Warren May 1, 2008. It was pretty exciting to help document this sighting.

What an unbelievable evening! I should probably take it easy now.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Everyday I’m hobblin’

“You’re a trooper” “You got some heart” “You’ll let nothing stop you” “Way to go!” “Are you okay?” These are the things people will say to you if you hike up Powell Butte Nature Park on crutches. I know this because I tried to find one of 11 Mountain Bluebirds spotted the day before, but unfortunately, all I found were well-meaning platitudes.

At least it was good exercise? I suppose. I feel I’d gotten cocky after convincing Tomas to drive by the fire station near Broughton Beach to look for a Rough-legged Hawk that’d been seen there. Found it!

Birding is so easy! Of course it is.

Most of my time this past weekend I spent hanging out with the yard birds, especially after I saw a Black-capped Chickadee show interest in a nesting box I put up last year. After many hours of watching though, it’s still unconfirmed if they’re using it.

Are you nesting here? Check yes or no.

Another highlight while sitting outside enjoying the spring sunshine was witnessing a wake of Turkey Vultures fly overhead.

This is the first time I’ve recorded them from the yard and I counted 20!

They just kept coming. This is the kind of stuff that makes yard-birding interesting.

While vultures migrated overhead, other birds were singing up a storm. I heard Varied Thrush, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, and Golden-crowned Kinglets jingling in the Doug-fir trees surrounding the yard.

I heard a handsome Fox Sparrow.

And a charming and perky-tailed Bewick’s Wren.

Hello ladies

At the feeders House Finch and Lesser Goldfinch add some color.

While the Red-breasted Nuthatch adds personality.

At the office I’ve spent more time watching the Anna’s Hummingbird nest than working.

She’s made regular feedings, but I haven’t seen any little hummers yet.

I’ve also yet to see a Rufous Hummingbird this year, but there’s still time.

The flowers have just sprung.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Birthday Birds

This year for my birthday I went on a day trip to the coast with my friends Sarah, Eric, and Jen. We hoped to see “Mr. Costa,” the Costa’s Hummingbird that visits Eric Horvath’s residence in Newport. Costa’s hummingbirds typically prefer Sonoran and Mojave Deserts, chaparral and sage scrub areas along the California coast, but for some reason, this little one likes Eric’s house instead. Lucky guy.

This is the same spot Jen and I unsuccessfully tried in March when the bird was in immature plumage, but it was back now in bright purple breeding plumage, giving us extra incentive to try again. We piled into the car and made way to the coast through rainstorms, sunshine, and occasional rainbows.

Along the way, we kept our eyes on the power lines looking for Tropical Kingbirds, but no luck. We stopped at Boiler Bay Viewpoint to see if any of the floating kelp might turn into auklets, no luck there either, but Sarah did spot fly-by Black Scoter; orange knobby bill, black wing-tips.

We arrived at Eric’s house next, and thanks to his generosity we saw a hummingbird three of us had never seen before, and in such an unusual place for Costa’s.

Happy birthday to me! Costa’s Hummingbird, lifer #450.

Costa’s, Blue-footed Booby combo

We watched Mr. Costa vigorously chatter and defend the feeder from resident Anna’s Hummingbirds. True to hummingbird form, he’s a feisty little bird.

Feeling pretty relaxed we enjoyed Eric’s other yard birds.

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Townsend’s Warbler

Hermit Thrush

We spent as much time as politely possible watching the Costa before finally saying our goodbyes. Walking back to the car down the street we stopped at Yaquina Bay just in time to see the Bald Eagle stir up the waterfowl.

And on the opposite side of the street in a marshy wetland, Sarah found me a state Virginia Rail! No visuals on this secretive bird (of course), but we heard the piggy-like grunt, “wep, wep, wepwepppprrr.”

And farther down the road…Red-shouldered Hawk!

We’d just been talking about these hawks, then it appeared. While in the area, we also visited the South Jetty and nearby Hatfield Marine Science Center estuary trails where we found other “red” birds.

Red-throated Loon (with that droopy neck)

Red-breasted Merganser

Red-necked Grebe

And we also found a nice surprise of five Marbled Godwits along the HMSC trails.

Overall, it was a fantastic birdy-birthday trip to the coast.

Despite the dramatic skies an occasional gull showers.

And I made it home to find Tomas had bought me banana cake and beer. The best of times! Cheers to another year of good birding and good friends.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey