Gone Birding – Eugene

Fireworks are going off. Summer must be here. It’s hot, birds have slowed down so now I can too. It’s been a busy couple of months! Back in May, Tomas and I took a weekend trip to Eugene for a Night at the Cascades Raptor Center. Wine, snacks, and owl entertainment provided for a small donation to help the birds? Shut up and take my money.

The facilities are great. They are situated on a forested hill much like Forest Park in Portland.

Yes, it was a little hard seeing these beautiful creatures in cages. But things happen, and sometimes animals need help. Like Nike, the Gyrfalcon that was found in 2005 with an infected eye that ultimately had to be removed.

No longer able to hunt, Nike is cared for and works as an education bird.

Same for the resident Northern Goshawk, Newton, who was imprinted when hatched and unable to release in the wild.

The birds here were so cool. Eurasian Eagle-Owl, White-tailed Kites, Barn Owls, a 13-year old Long-eared Owl, American Kestrels, Burrowing Owl, and a freakin Snowy Owl named Archimedes.

Gah. And it was making it’s bark-like hoot.

Kit Lacy, the Education Director led us around the facilities. Here she is with a Burrowing Owl, named Ra.

Later in the evening, we finally heard Ravi, the Western Screech Owl singing her ping-pong song. She was the lone survivor in a nest cut down by logging in 2005 and is now a favorite of the Education Team.

I’m glad we finally made the trip out here, it was definitely worth the visit. All of the animals are “adoptable” with funds going to the support and care of the birds. This visit was also a fun introductory as I’ve joined the Portland Audubon Wildlife Care Center volunteer team for baby bird season this year. It’s been one of the most altruistic experiences. And the most duck poop I’ve ever seen.

Back to Eugene. My local friend, Rachel, recommended checking out a few places including Stewart Pond and Skinner Butte.

At the pond I found Long-billed Dowitcher (based on location).

A surprise Solitary Sandpiper.

And nesting Red-winged Blackbirds stalked by Great Blue Heron.

But I had the best time at Skinner Butte. It’s not terribly big, smaller than Mt Tabor, but I ended up spending almost 6 hours there. Too much fun. It’s a known stopover for migrating warblers.

Warblers indeed. There were Black-throated Gray.

Nashville.

And gobs of Orange-crowned Warblers.

To name a few. I also saw a MacGillivray’s but couldn’t manage a photo. I saw a few other migrating birds including, Cassin’s Vireo and many Warbling Vireo.

And a nice surprise Calliope Hummingbird!

Also, Pacific-slope Flycatcher.

And Turkey Vultures sunning themselves.

And I spent a lot of time watching Black-capped Chickadees collecting nesting material.

At one point I almost left, but then right by the parking lot, I spotted my FOY Western Tanager.

It was near impossible to leave.

You’re not going anywhere.

Eventually, after so many hours, hunger got the best of me and I met back up with Tomas for the best beers and burgers at Coldfire Brewing and its associated food cart Haybaby. Followed by a sunset swift watch at Agate Hall!

Apparently, the Vaux’s Swift population is more active in springtime in Eugene.

Who knew? It was the perfect ending to a fulfilling trip!

I heart Eugene.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

February birds…

If January could be summed up by snow, February can be summed up by RAIN. All caps because it’s ridiculous. We can’t seem to catch a break. Luckily, birds still have stuff to do regardless of the weather. They’re out there and occasionally I joined them. Yesterday, Tomas and I went to Ridgefield NWR for some comfy drive-thru birding.

Would you like fries with that?

Swans have returned to the refuge, both Trumpeter and Tundra though the Tundra Swans stood out more to me with their yellow lores.

This one flew in for a nice photo-op.

Red-winged Blackbirds were singing in the rain.

And this American Coot couldn’t give a coot.

There were Bald Eagles, American Kestrel, Northern Harrier, and of course Red-tailed Hawks along the route.

But we got the biggest surprise when approaching the park exit.

Not one, but two Rough-legged Hawks! I’ve seen this type of hawk a couple of times, but only as a passenger in a vehicle flying along the highway with no time to enjoy. This time we could observe from the heated car as long as we pleased.

They have a small bill, light head and dark belly. One had a paler eyes, a juvenile bird, while the other had dark eyes, an adult bird. Both appear to have the light morph color pattern.

And of course they have feathered tarsi, or those “rough legs.”

They perched for a long time, sometimes fanning their wings out to dry. Until finally one flew from the tree and this was when we learned how they hunt. They face into the wind and hover! Similar to American Kestrels. The hover and scan the ground looking for small mammals. I made an animated gif to show the hovering in action:

Pretty sweet. Glad we made it out in the rain!

Much more to come. February isn’t over yet.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Vancouver Lake

It’s been a while since I’ve seen a new sparrow. Certainly not for lack of trying. Since before the first of this year, I’ve looked for little brown birds with that extra bit of flair at several locations including Jackson Bottom, Fernhill Wetlands, Ridgefield NWR, Sauvie Island, and Vancouver Lake. But still no luck.

So when I saw White-throated Sparrows were a target species for one of Audubon’s free outings a couple of weeks ago I was pumped. We met early at Vancouver Lake on a day forecast for steady rain showers.

Audubon outing

The lake waters started slow, a couple of Double-crested Cormorants flew by, and Cackling Geese flew overhead, and then things picked up with thousands of Snow Geese, multiple Sandhill Cranes, and a pair of Tundra Swans passing by above.

Audubon outing

Walking along the trails increased our species sightings with Western Meadowlark, Fox Sparrows, White-breasted Nuthatch, Pacific Wren, Red-winged Blackbird, Great Blue Heron, Great Egret, and American Kestrel. To name a few.

Audubon outing

Walking back on the park roads that’s when the sparrow magic happened.

White-throated Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

Not just a pile of leaves, there’s a White-Throated Sparrow in there!  There were a few hopping around and kicking leaves within the groups of Golden-Crowned Sparrows and Dark-eyed Juncos. Success! Sometimes it helps to have more eyes and a seasoned guide to find the bird.

Oddly, on this trip I took more pictures of people than birds even though we saw more than 50 species! It was not the greatest light conditions, but with no rain AND a new sparrow? I call that a good day.

Audrey