An excellent week of birds

It started when I left work early one day to find a rare Snowy Egret in the Vancouver Lake Lowlands that was associating with a Great Egret and Mallard decoy.

Also present were Greater Yellowlegs, a couple of hardy Tree and Barn Swallows, and Purple Finch, a year bird I was happy to see lower in the branches.

On the way out a flash of black and white caught my eye.

Ah, yes. Migration was in full swing as Snow Geese, Cackling Geese, and Sandhill Cranes came and went. I pulled over to take a look.

It was hard to pull myself away.

The following weekend I was excited to join Sarah and Max for some Oregon county birding. We went south on I-5 to Talking Waters Gardens, a place I’ve never birded before located in Linn County.

It was fantastic water treatment-wetland habitat full of American Wigeon, Hooded Merganser, Virginia Rails, and even one vocal Sora (my first Oregon Sora!). No visuals of the Sora, unfortunately, but we did locate three Black Phoebe.

1/3 phoebes

 Several Lincoln Sparrows.

And a moderately cooperative White-throated Sparrow hanging out in a corner of the ponds.

It was still early in the day when we completed the trails so we drove north making a quick stop at Waverly Park where we found a couple of Western Gulls and a FOY Green Heron. Then it was onward to Ankeny National Wildlife to (officially) add birds in Marion County which included distant Dusky Canada Geese with red neck collars.

And muddy-faced swans.

Not making it easy to ID

Luckily there were a couple with visible yellow lores helping to confidently ID them as the more expected, Tundra Swans.

We also stopped at the Rail Trail on the refuge to walk on a boardwalk through Oregon Ash wetlands.

The water was so high it reminded me a bit of Florida’s wetlands but without the moss and humidity. Along the trail we found more Black Phoebe, White-breasted Nuthatch, Downy Woodpecker, and Max heard a Red-breasted Sapsucker that we eventually spotted right at the water’s edge.

Not something you see every day.

The next morning I got up before dawn to chase a sea duck. There’d been a report of a female Steller’s Eider at Seaside Cove on the Oregon coast but I had an appointment with a tree-trimmer at 12:30pm so I didn’t have any time to waste. I left the house at 5am and arrived at Seaside when it was still dark. Luckily, there were already two birders there making me feel totally normal.

One was Trent Bray, avid birder and shop owner of Bobolink, a birding (disc golf, and beer) supply store in La Grande, Oregon. Trent had left La Grande at 1am that morning but it paid off because he already had the bird in the scope. We watched it dive and ride the waves drifting out farther as more birders arrived on scene.

The bird became harder to locate in the waves and we felt a bit bummed. But then the eider flew right back to us. Hooray!

What a good duck. We all cheered and took hundreds of photos. The blocky head, the pale eye-ring, and two white wing bars were clearly visible on this first-winter female bird. She was cooperative, clearly not minding the attention. Or the surfers.

Surfer, surfer, eider, scoter combo

Steller’s Eiders are listed as threatened and rarely found outside of Alaska. This is only Oregon’s fourth record.

I was giddy and thrilled I’d taken time to come visit her. And because it was so easy, I had at least 10 more minutes to look for a Palm Warbler at a nearby water treatment plant (thanks for the tip, Sarah!).

Success! I found it with minimal difficulty though it didn’t want to be seen. A warbler less cooperative than a rare sea duck, go figure. Running out of time I dashed the two hours home and made it within minutes of meeting the arborist. Winning.

Not far from the house on another day I found the Greater White-fronted Geese frequenting the golf course by Force Lake, and in a tree next to the parking lot a Sharp-shinned Hawk practicing being ferocious.

This one had perfected the stink-eye.

And on another local outing at Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge I attempted to find a Red-shouldered Hawk. I’d unknowingly walked right by it until I spotted a Red-tailed Hawk that ignited the fire in the Red-shouldered and it vocalized loudly and chased its competition away.

Birding has been good to me this month. To say the least. Next month might be a different story, but more about that later. Until then, I’m enjoying everything I can get!

And that includes my FOY-yard Townsend’s Warbler!

Back and cute as ever.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Florida: Boyd Hill Nature Preserve and Lake Seminole Park

Last Florida post! In the final days of my trip, my dad and I visited a couple of local city parks, one in St. Petersburg called Boyd Hill Nature Preserve. This park reminded me of Texas parks; there’s an admission fee, set hours (nature is closed on Mondays), a gift shop, and even an optional tram service. Aside from all that there’s marsh, swamp, oaks, and scrubland goodness that winds 6 miles through trails and boardwalks.

There’s also an aviary with rehabbed birds where I saw my only Eastern Screech Owl of the trip. Nice squinty face.

My dad and I walked the trails dodging troops of singing children and searched for what birds we could find. There’d be long stretches of quiet, and then a bustle of birds would turn up.

The biggest showing was on one single bush. I would love to know what kind of plant this is (Sideroxylon salicifolium, willow-bustic, white bully?). It hosted Yellow-rumped Warbler.

Followed by:

Palm Warbler

Blue-headed Vireo

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Antcatcher)

Pine Warbler and Downy Woodpecker (trust me).

Also a Northern Cardinal and Carolina Wren, followed by my only Carolina Chickadee of the trip.

And here I had my first sighting of a Tufted Titmouse.

10 species in one bush all at once! It was incredible.

Tufted Titmice show up, and all of a sudden they multiply and many more call a scratchy “tsee-tsee-tsee,” as they gather together in the treetops then all disappear again.

I think around this point I mentioned I hadn’t seen a Black-and-white Warbler yet on the trip, and voilà, one showed up!

If only it always worked like that.

We had a good Pileated-Red-bellied Woodpecker combo.

And the end of a boardwalk that led us to this perfect Anhinga statue.

I’m so happy this exists. Good job Boyd Hill Nature Preserve.

Moving on to my dad’s local patch in Seminole, FL, Lake Seminole Park, where first thing in the morning I had a blurry lifer Monk Parakeet flyover.

Still counts

We then found a great pair of Purple Gallinule. A young brown one.

And a purple adult.

By then it was time to say goodbye to some of Florida’s best birds.

Northern Cardinal

Little Blue Heron

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Osprey

Noisy nutty Blue Jay

We had another warbler flurry that included Yellow-throated Warbler.

Prairie Warbler.

And Pine Warbler.

In the shrubs we coaxed out a Brown Thrasher.

And passed a “soon to be flying squirrel.” Good one, dad.

Mushrooms were clearly in bloom.

I noted a White Peacock butterfly.

And drug my feet leaving the park. We finally called it a day when we found a Wood Stork that hadn’t been there moments before.

Hanging with his friend, Great Egret. It was one of those classic Florida birding moments that I’ve grown to love (and miss!). Until next time, Florida!

See you later alligator.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Florida: Circle B Bar Reserve II

Circling back to Limpkins. I was excited to see these subdued brown and white streaked waterbirds because Florida is its northernmost breeding range. It’s highly uncommon to find them north of southern Georgia and I certainly can’t see them in Oregon.

Structurally related to cranes and named for a perceived limp when they walk, Limpkins are the only surviving species in the genus Aramus and the family Aramidae. They were hunted almost to extinction in the 20th century.

They are no longer listed in Florida (as of January 11, 2017), but are part of the Imperiled Species Management Plan. Populations have improved since protections were enabled, but of course they’re still threatened by what ails most birds today: habitat loss.

They have an unmistakable wailing call that’s even been used in films (jungle sound effects in the Tarzan films, and for the hippogriff  in the film Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkabanz). Hearing their call was almost as good as seeing them. Here’s a recording I took that includes the sound of baby Limpkins begging at the end.

One goal of the trip was to see a Limpkin, and I’d say that was a smashing success.

We had other successes too, including Purple Gallinule.

So pretty! And much more secretive than the Common Gallinule.

Another glistening bird was the Boat-tailed Grackle.

Above our heads were kettles of both Black and Turkey Vultures.

Occasionally we’d spot a Red-Shouldered Hawk.

You know those moments when you’re trying to get a good look at a bird, particularly a warbler in the trees, and you get the feeling it might be something new and different? Usually it turns out to be a Palm Warbler.

But every once in a while, it turns out to be a Northern Parula!

The gray hood, white eye crescents, wing bars, and that bright yellow chest means this is a female Northern Parula. So exciting to find a new warbler. Some day I’d like to meet her handsome male counterpart. Not far from the parula something orange caught my eye. Had to be something good, I knew it.

Indeed! Behind that leaf is a Baltimore Oriole! Another life-bird courtesy of Circle B.

Another goodie we came across was a White-eyed Vireo.

Followed by my lifer Blue-headed Vireo eating a moth snack.

We saw a lot of birds at Circle B and every time we were done for the day we had a difficult time leaving the park. Just one more bird! One day it was impossible to leave because my dad’s car battery died. No, I didn’t sabotage it 😉 but this did mean we could bird for another hour!

This turned out to be a pretty magical hour. First I saw something intriguing sneaking around low in the bushes.

It wasn’t until later that I recognized how awesome this sighting was – my first Painted Bunting! I got such a quick look at the time that I didn’t notice the green sheen on this female bird. I thought it looked like an exotic escapee finch, but it’s actually a lovely wild finch.

Around another corner I noticed a small dove that looked different from the Mourning Doves.

It has a scaly neck, and a pinkish bill with a dark tip, making it a Common Ground Dove. New dove!

Then below the tree I saw a small weird statue.

The statue moved and morphed into an armadillo! Native to southwestern North America, the Nine-banded Armadillo was introduced and expanded its territory to Florida. They’re creepy cute.

It’s a good thing Florida has signs on how to hand this situation. I did not climb the armadillo.

Other birds seen while waiting for AAA:

Pine Warbler; different from Palm Warblers with white wing-bars and a non-wagging tail.

Northern Cardinal

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Prairie Warbler

And a doe-eyed Tufted Titmouse!

Gah! – So cute.

Overall, we saw 63 species at Circle B, 8 of which were life-birds for me, including the Fish Crow that looks identical to American Crows, but says “uh-uh” instead of “caw-caw.” Audio here.

The battery was fixed and it was time for us to leave Circle B Bar Reserve.

Just one more bird.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey