Gone Birding – Eugene

Fireworks are going off. Summer must be here. It’s hot, birds have slowed down so now I can too. It’s been a busy couple of months! Back in May, Tomas and I took a weekend trip to Eugene for a Night at the Cascades Raptor Center. Wine, snacks, and owl entertainment provided for a small donation to help the birds? Shut up and take my money.

The facilities are great. They are situated on a forested hill much like Forest Park in Portland.

Yes, it was a little hard seeing these beautiful creatures in cages. But things happen, and sometimes animals need help. Like Nike, the Gyrfalcon that was found in 2005 with an infected eye that ultimately had to be removed.

No longer able to hunt, Nike is cared for and works as an education bird.

Same for the resident Northern Goshawk, Newton, who was imprinted when hatched and unable to release in the wild.

The birds here were so cool. Eurasian Eagle-Owl, White-tailed Kites, Barn Owls, a 13-year old Long-eared Owl, American Kestrels, Burrowing Owl, and a freakin Snowy Owl named Archimedes.

Gah. And it was making it’s bark-like hoot.

Kit Lacy, the Education Director led us around the facilities. Here she is with a Burrowing Owl, named Ra.

Later in the evening, we finally heard Ravi, the Western Screech Owl singing her ping-pong song. She was the lone survivor in a nest cut down by logging in 2005 and is now a favorite of the Education Team.

I’m glad we finally made the trip out here, it was definitely worth the visit. All of the animals are “adoptable” with funds going to the support and care of the birds. This visit was also a fun introductory as I’ve joined the Portland Audubon Wildlife Care Center volunteer team for baby bird season this year. It’s been one of the most altruistic experiences. And the most duck poop I’ve ever seen.

Back to Eugene. My local friend, Rachel, recommended checking out a few places including Stewart Pond and Skinner Butte.

At the pond I found Long-billed Dowitcher (based on location).

A surprise Solitary Sandpiper.

And nesting Red-winged Blackbirds stalked by Great Blue Heron.

But I had the best time at Skinner Butte. It’s not terribly big, smaller than Mt Tabor, but I ended up spending almost 6 hours there. Too much fun. It’s a known stopover for migrating warblers.

Warblers indeed. There were Black-throated Gray.

Nashville.

And gobs of Orange-crowned Warblers.

To name a few. I also saw a MacGillivray’s but couldn’t manage a photo. I saw a few other migrating birds including, Cassin’s Vireo and many Warbling Vireo.

And a nice surprise Calliope Hummingbird!

Also, Pacific-slope Flycatcher.

And Turkey Vultures sunning themselves.

And I spent a lot of time watching Black-capped Chickadees collecting nesting material.

At one point I almost left, but then right by the parking lot, I spotted my FOY Western Tanager.

It was near impossible to leave.

You’re not going anywhere.

Eventually, after so many hours, hunger got the best of me and I met back up with Tomas for the best beers and burgers at Coldfire Brewing and its associated food cart Haybaby. Followed by a sunset swift watch at Agate Hall!

Apparently, the Vaux’s Swift population is more active in springtime in Eugene.

Who knew? It was the perfect ending to a fulfilling trip!

I heart Eugene.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Laughing at the Coast

Last weekend I had a roller coaster of a birding trip. But that’s to be expected when chasing rarities. There were at least seven rare birds reported near Newport (Say’s Phoebe, Solitary Sandpiper, Northern Mockingbird, Marbled Godwit, Nashville Warbler (early), Palm Warbler, and Laughing Gull). Laughing Gull?! Who brought back the Texas souvenir?

It wasn’t me. But I have missed the southern birds so I figured why not reunite with at least one? If I could find a few other rarities it would make the long drive worth it. I set off. And was almost immediately detoured by some intriguing-looking geese.

When you see a small group of geese on the side of the road you pull over. But upon closer examination, these turned out to be Domestic Geese.

According to Cornell what makes these different from Snow or Ross’s Geese: “typically domestic geese have orange bills and feet, lack the black wing feathers, and have shape differences such as heavy bottoms and an ungainly waddle.” I didn’t see their legs or their waddle, but the lack of black wing feathers was a tell-tale sign not to get excited.

With only one day to spend at the coast, I didn’t have time to stop for domestic incidentals. Eventually I made it to South Beach State Park the last reported location of the Laughing Gull where luckily I bumped into Wayne Hoffman, a local birder who pointed me in the right direction. Towards the teeny dots in the distance.

This is when it’s extra hard to stay on track and pass up views of Northern Harriers carrying nesting materials, exotic-sounding Yellow-rumped Warblers, fly-by Caspian Terns, and flocks of Savannah Sparrows among the driftwood. Stay on target.

So many pretty distractions

Three stream crossings, two miles, and two soaked feet later, a pair of birders passed me from the opposite direction carrying a scope. They gave me the thumbs up and I knew it was all okay. Not long after, the gull flew by.

Laughing Gull! Oregon’s 4th record! And this one has one leg making it extra special.

I watched for a while as it flew and hopped around the Mew Gulls, and then it ate an undetermined ocean object, before settling down at the shore with a ridiculously large crop.

I was worried about the bulge, but the gull has been reported since then, so all is well digested. I left the gull and trekked back across the streams and the two miles back to the car. Later I learned the Northern Mockingbird was located at the first stream crossing. Strike one. That’ll teach me to walk by distractions.

From here I drove the short distance to the Hatfield Marine Science Center estuary nature trail where the reported Palm Warbler has regularly wintered. This bird (which I associate most with Florida neighborhoods) was one I was most excited to see. Along the trail I passed Tree Swallows, Common Yellowthroat, Orange-crowned Warblers, Savannah Sparrows and the most handsome Lincoln Sparrow.

Then I spotted two birders at the bird blind. I asked if they’d happened to see a Palm Warbler. The woman exclaimed they’d just seen one! And I’d just missed it. She said “you have to see my pictures” and she “didn’t even realize what it was” and “isn’t that disgusting?” Her words, not mine. I asked which way the bird flew then politely looked at her photos.

I really wanted to be happy for her and after some snacks and time I genuinely was. Not finding the Palm Warbler was a disappointment, but I was a 5 min drive from the South Jetty where a second Palm Warbler had been seen as well as all the other rarities. But I didn’t find any of those this time either.

If the goal had been to find Golden-crowned Sparrows, Orange-crowned Warblers, a Wrentit, gobs of Savannah Sparrows and a Red-necked Grebe in breeding plumage then I was highly successful.

I think the best sighting here may have been a fly-by Pigeon Guillemot.

It was getting late. But not late enough to check the estuary trail again for the warbler. I walked along the trail maybe 20 feet when I saw some fluttering by a big ugly building.

No way. There was the warbler flying around the backside of the pipes on the building. Not perched prettily on driftwood, but at least it was a science center and not Walmart?

This bird is pro-science.

So pretty! Glad I went back to check on it again. I was running short on time and I could have ended the day here, but the Salishan Nature Trail where a Nashville Warbler was sighted was mostly on the way home. Why not make a quick stop for a look?

An hour and a half of quick looking later I finally saw the Nashville, but so briefly that I didn’t even count it. I got much better looks of Ruby-crowned Kinglets.

Common Yellowthroat.

And a Rufous Hummingbird!

M’lady Rufous. One of my favorites.

And just as I was leaving I saw a Sharp-shinned Hawk also on a bird hunt.

I wished I had more time. Lesson learned, one day is not enough to find all the rare birds on the coast. I started the three hour drive home, and along the way, next to a field in Grand Ronde I spotted an intriguing white bird hovering over a field.

White-tailed Kite! When you see a White-tailed Kite you pull over. I’ve only seen one other WTKI in Oregon and I had to work hard for it. This one was a treat. I watched from the side of the road as it hunted.

It eventually caught a rodent and then flew off into the distance. I’d come a long way from those Domestic Geese. So many highs so many lows. Such is the case when chasing rarities. Hilariously good times!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Springtime Birds

Back home from Texas and it’s spring in Portland? I’m okay with that.

My 5 mi radius has blown up lately. The evening before I left for Texas, a Rufous Hummingbird paid our feeder a visit.  First time for the yard!

And on a more recent morning, I found an unlucky Anna’s Hummingbird knocked out on our doorstep (I think after a territory dispute). It was barely alive and a tragic find. But with Tomas’s help and a little warmth and sugar-water, the little guy bounced back a little and got a second chance. Tomas wrote a heartfelt post about the experience.

In other yard news, after a big wind storm a couple of weeks ago, I noticed a metal box-lid lifted on a contraption next to the garage door.

Inside I found a nest!

Not knowing if it was viable or not, I waited and checked back a week later.

Three more eggs! I had assumed they were likely House Finch (based on size, color and nest location), but after checking on the nest tonight, I accidentally spooked mama-bird.

It’s a Bewick’s Wren nest! So exciting. She picked a high-traffic spot, but we will have to make a point to give her space. Love our backyard birds.

Also this month I spent some time at Broughton Beach after reading reports of a reliable Red-throated Loon. Unfortunately, on my first attempt I ended up loon-less.

And soaking wet after a huge rainstorm. But just before the downpour I found an American Pipit.

And a Savannah Sparrow! I’ve missed them at the beach.

So it was all rainbows.

And the following morning I returned and successfully located the loon! So easy.

X’s 2 when a second loon flew by! Doubly reliable! A few other lucky flybys at Broughton included a Cliff Swallow.

An Osprey carrying nesting materials.

And a flock of unmistakable American White Pelicans.

More good finds were had nearby at Whitaker Ponds, including an Orange-crowned Warbler.

And the most amazing looks of Black-throated Gray Warblers.

More warblers, yes, please. Mt Tabor Park happily oblidged. Plenty more Orange-crowned Warblers.

And FOY Nashville Warblers! Hooray!

I also officially identified a Purple Finch singing on top of a high perch. A good clue to ID was it sounded like a warbler. It’s a long over-due life-bird and a solid 5mi radius species. Hopefully I’ll get better visuals in the future.

I also played hide-and-seek with a Hermit Thrush. And lost.

But I won a Pacific-slope Flycatcher when it popped into my binocular view.

And a small surprise flock of Evening Grosbeak.

There’s something about their warm, striking color pattern that blows my mind.

I’m so happy it’s springtime! Bring on the flowers, sunshine, and birds!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey