Springtime Birds

Back home from Texas and it’s spring in Portland? I’m okay with that.

My 5 mi radius has blown up lately. The evening before I left for Texas, a Rufous Hummingbird paid our feeder a visit.  First time for the yard!

And on a more recent morning, I found an unlucky Anna’s Hummingbird knocked out on our doorstep (I think after a territory dispute). It was barely alive and a tragic find. But with Tomas’s help and a little warmth and sugar-water, the little guy bounced back a little and got a second chance. Tomas wrote a heartfelt post about the experience.

In other yard news, after a big wind storm a couple of weeks ago, I noticed a metal box-lid lifted on a contraption next to the garage door.

Inside I found a nest!

Not knowing if it was viable or not, I waited and checked back a week later.

Three more eggs! I had assumed they were likely House Finch (based on size, color and nest location), but after checking on the nest tonight, I accidentally spooked mama-bird.

It’s a Bewick’s Wren nest! So exciting. She picked a high-traffic spot, but we will have to make a point to give her space. Love our backyard birds.

Also this month I spent some time at Broughton Beach after reading reports of a reliable Red-throated Loon. Unfortunately, on my first attempt I ended up loon-less.

And soaking wet after a huge rainstorm. But just before the downpour I found an American Pipit.

And a Savannah Sparrow! I’ve missed them at the beach.

So it was all rainbows.

And the following morning I returned and successfully located the loon! So easy.

X’s 2 when a second loon flew by! Doubly reliable! A few other lucky flybys at Broughton included a Cliff Swallow.

An Osprey carrying nesting materials.

And a flock of unmistakable American White Pelicans.

More good finds were had nearby at Whitaker Ponds, including an Orange-crowned Warbler.

And the most amazing looks of Black-throated Gray Warblers.

More warblers, yes, please. Mt Tabor Park happily oblidged. Plenty more Orange-crowned Warblers.

And FOY Nashville Warblers! Hooray!

I also officially identified a Purple Finch singing on top of a high perch. A good clue to ID was it sounded like a warbler. It’s a long over-due life-bird and a solid 5mi radius species. Hopefully I’ll get better visuals in the future.

I also played hide-and-seek with a Hermit Thrush. And lost.

But I won a Pacific-slope Flycatcher when it popped into my binocular view.

And a small surprise flock of Evening Grosbeak.

There’s something about their warm, striking color pattern that blows my mind.

I’m so happy it’s springtime! Bring on the flowers, sunshine, and birds!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Newberry Caldera

In an attempt to avoid firework noise and pack in nature time over 4th of July weekend, Tomas and I headed southeast past Bend to the Newberry National Volcanic Monument in the Deschutes National Forest.

Within the park is Newberry Caldera, which formed 75,000 years ago after an eruption-explosion-collapse event of a shield-shaped volcano, Newberry Volcano, apparently the largest volcano in the Cascades volcanic arc (the size of Rhode Island). Impressive stuff.

Caldera

Neither of us had been to the monument before and we looked forward to exploring unknown territory. We arrived late Friday night, scanned (and rejected) one official campground that was packed with noisy campers, and instead opted for our new favorite camping method, no-frills dispersed camping. Just a simple, quiet place to sleep.

Open air

No rainfly!

The next day, Tomas mountain biked 20 miles around the caldera, while I drove to Paulina Peak for a short hike and to check out the views. And birds. ALFB (Always Looking For Birds).

Paulina Peak

There are some pretty stunning views of the mountains, lakes, and surrounding volcanic features from the peak. At first I was kind of annoyed at a couple of dudes who climbed the rock in the distance putting themselves right in the middle of the nature scene.

View

But then I looked closer and all was forgiven. Hilarious.

So much macho

Macho rock men

They weren’t the only ones admiring the view.

Dark-eyed Junco

So much macho

I hiked the short distance to the rock and back, noting Western Tanager, Clark’s Nutcracker (of course, so easy), and many Yellow-rumped Warblers.

Yellow-rumped Warbler

And Rock Wrens singing away.

Rock Wren

And I heard for the first time the “ringing tew”  (or “squeaky eek“) of the Townsend’s Solitaire call. To me it sounds more like a rusty wheel. Really glad I matched the bird to the call, it’s pretty unusual! Unfortunately, no usable pics.

I left Paulina Peak and headed to the Big Obsidian Flow I could see below. This flow is the “youngest” in Oregon at only 1300 years old.

Obsidian Flow

Driving there I came across two (!) Common Nighthawks dead on the roadway.

Common Nighthawk

Common Nighthawk

Ugh. So terribly heartbreaking. I moved them off the road into the trees. Somehow it seemed better.

There weren’t many birds at the flow, Rock Wren, Red Crossbill, more yellow-rumps, but there was a heck of a lot of cool lava rock (basalt, rhyolite, and obsidian).

The Big Obsidian

Obsidian Flow

Life

I was fascinated with the few scattered trees growing out of the rocks. Against all odds.

A ranger told me that a pika family lives near the bottom of the stairs at the Obsidian Flow, but I couldn’t find them this day. And it was getting late, so I returned to the parking lot to meet back up with Tomas.

While waiting I came up with Pine Siskin, Red-breasted Sapsucker, Brewer’s Blackbird, a quick glance at an Evening Grosbeak flock(!), and Red Crossbills. Here’s a consolation crossbill photo because I missed the Evening Grossbeaks. Dang.

Red Crossbill

The monument is full of lava flows, lakes, and spectacular geologic features. And it’s still seismically and geothermally active! We felt good even having explored a fraction of it before moving on to our next destination.

View

I never get tired of that view.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey