Curry County

I’d survived a pelagic trip and a night in the dorms. I was five hours from home and ready for my next adventure. It was the perfect time to visit Curry County, one of the counties in Oregon I’d never previously birded in.

This is my favorite kind of birding. New county, all new birds, no schedule and completely on my own agenda. I could sit for hours looking for sparrows if I wanted to. And of course I did want to. There were reports of Clay-colored Sparrows in the area so I had good reason. I spent a lot of time at Arizona Beach State Recreation Site.

My favorite sighting started with a soft warbling song I heard through the trees and brush. I thought it might be a catbird, but eventually I caught sight of the little songster.

An American Dipper! There was only a tiny portion of stream flowing and it was right above it singing its little heart out. I may have melted.

Back at the pond across the highway there were two Blue-winged Teal best identified as they’re flying away.

And many unmistakable Black Phoebe.

I got a good look at this young Red-shouldered Hawk looking for a meal.

And on the way out I saw a HUGE flock of California Quail.

“Chicaaaaagoooooo!”

I saw a few sparrows.

Golden, golden, song, white-crowned, golden

But it took a many tries to get this blurry photo of a Chipping Sparrow.

To find shorebirds it was suggested I try out Floras Lake, especially at the end of the trail by Floras Creek through the grassy dunes.

It was beautiful. But unfortunately both times I visited winds were blowing 20+mph.

Reenactment at Cape Blanco State Park

Not ideal shorebirding conditions. So instead I drove farther south to Gold Beach “where the Pacific meets the Rogue” and where I met a few birds like this bright Yellow Warbler.

Still no shorebirds or terns I could find, but eventually I spotted a sparrow flock that looked interesting. Indeed.

Clay-colored Sparrow!

It looks similar to Chipping Sparrows but has pale lores and is more buffy. They’re an unusual treat to see in Oregon and I was thrilled to see this one.

Back in Port Orford I stayed at the Castaway By the Sea Motel that has thin walls but excellent views.

In the bay below I found Common Murre, a few gulls, and three types of loons that I’ve included all together in one convenient photo.

The largest-billed loon on far left is a Common Loon, the one in the middle with the chin strap is a Pacific Loon, and on far right with the upturned bill is a Red-throated Loon (not to scale). If only they would always swim together like this.

Such good times. I left Curry County having seen 70 species! On the way home I stopped at Cape Arago State Park in Coos County for Harlequin Ducks.

And I re-visited Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge for White-tailed Kites that were missed during the shorebird festival. They were very distant but there were two!

Bringing me to 101 species in Coos County. Not bad. And because there are a lot of places to stop in the four hours from before home, I decided to stick with the shorebird theme and visit the American Avocet at Finley National Wildlife Refuge.

If this isn’t a shorebird festival, I don’t know what is.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Michigan- Yard Birds

After 7 years together it was time I finally met my boyfriend’s family. NBD. We’d just take a red-eye flight to Detroit, Michigan and hang out with everyone for a week. His niece Kellie was having a graduation party so it was a good time to make the trip.

His parents’ back yard was awesome. His mom had bird feeders out, so I knew we’d get along. I spent the majority of my time at the house either outside or staring out the back patio window. It was pretty great.

Cardinal through the window

House Sparrow and Northern Cardinal

The porch was often covered in Downy Woodpeckers.

Hi, welcome to Michigan

In the yard were Chipping Sparrows and Michigan’s state bird, the American Robin.

Young ones learning to fly and older pros taking their worm for a walk.

Not a statue

I explored the neighborhood and found Cedar Waxwing, American Goldfinch, Tufted Titmouse.

A Blue Jay at the playground.

And a pair of dreamy Eastern Bluebirds.

I looked up to see a Chimney Swift! They look a heck of a lot like Vaux’s Swifts back home.

Sometimes the weather wasn’t the best, it was warm, muggy, and often raining making it better to stay dry indoors watching the feeders.

Downy Woodpecker

Blue Jay

White-breasted Nuthatch

Red-bellied Woodpecker

I got brief glimpses of a female hummingbird, but sadly no photos. The only one it could be this time of year is a Ruby-throated Hummingbird.

There was also a backyard flycatcher that I think is an Eastern Phoebe. I’m still working through my Michigan flycatchers.

The best bird in the yard was shy and only flashed an occasional orange in the bushes.

It took a while, but eventually enough of the bird popped out to identify it as a Baltimore Oriole!

Note the all-black hood and orange on the outer tail feathers. A mystery I was happy to have solved. It was such a peaceful and quiet backyard I could hang out there for hours.

Tomas and I went outside at night but didn’t hear any owls or nightjars as I’d hoped, instead we saw fireflies! I haven’t seen those since I lived in Virginia in the early 2000s. Made me wish I’d brought my night-photography setup, check out these cool photos of firefly timelapses.

Next time Michigan!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Fall Mountain Fire Lookout

Staying in a fire lookout is as cool as it sounds. Several lookouts in Oregon are available for rent but are incredibly popular and hard to get into. Tomas and I were lucky enough to snag his coworker’s reservation for Fall Mountain Fire Lookout when he couldn’t go. We happily drove 5 hours east to the Malheur National forest to stay for two nights.

The views were stunning. And the lookout was fully equipped with a stove, fridge, and even a heater.

What more could you ask for?

The surrounding forest was equipped with birds. Regulars were a pair of Mountain Bluebirds.

That would sometimes pick bugs out of the fire pit. We didn’t make a fire so it was okay.

One of the first birds I saw were Cassin’s Finch, one a juvenile begging for food.

Gross-cool.

It took me forever to I.D. this Dusky Flycatcher as it flicked it’s long tail, and called Chirrit, brrk, chirreet. Not the easiest flycatcher to I.D. but I powered through.

Luckily, there were easier birds, like this Green-tailed Towhee.

Songsters included a Townsend’s Warbler that I never did see, and Yellow-rumped Warblers that were much more conspicuous.

A Hermit Thrush made a brief appearance.

One morning I drove to a burn location to see if I could find some woodpeckers. I found three (!) White-headed Woodpeckers.

Two Black-backed Woodpeckers.

And a pair of Hairy Woodpeckers.

At the burn location was also House Wren feeding young, Chipping Sparrows, Dark-eyed Junco, White-breasted Nuthatch, and a surprise pair of Rufous Hummingbirds.

When it warmed up in the afternoons, I returned to the lookout where Tomas and I would lay in hammocks in the breeze.

It was pretty relaxing, and I could watch birds at the same time, like this pair of Western Tanager.

In the evenings, from the deck we watched Common Nighthawks soar in the sky.

It really was a spectacular show. And even better watching from eye-level.

Despite the distance getting to the lookout, the obnoxious motorcyclists that couldn’t read the “Do Not Disturb the Guests” sign, and those stairs that were scary as hell, it was all totally worth it for the experience.

Especially worth it for the sunsets from bed. Gorgeous stuff!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey