January Birds

January was a good month for birds.

Happy New Year

Inspired by a fellow local birder friend, Jen, I’m trying out birding a 5 mile radius from home and using eBird’s “patch” options to track species. Basically, pick a few places to regularly bird and add them to a patch. It’s a good way to explore nearby parks, maybe save some time driving, and it’s a fun challenge to find new species in regular patches. I started off strong on January 1st with 55 species including a visiting Burrowing Owl at Broughton Beach!

Then the snow came.

8-14″ in some places. My 5 mile radius turned into about 5 feet outside my front door. Luckily I had some decent snowy yard birds. Including a Varied Thrush!

The birds seemed appreciative of the extra suet and seeds I put out. The bird bath turned into an elevated feeder dish.

Dark-eyed Junco and Black-capped Chickadee

California Scrub-Jay

Golden-crowned Sparrow

Most of the common yard birds made an appearance.

Bushtits

House Finch

Downy Woodpecker

I think my most favorite to watch were the Dark-eyed Juncos. They seemed right at home in the snow.

I even had a Slate-colored Dark-eyed Junco, a less common winter-visiting variety. Note the lack of contrasting hood.

They don’t call them snowbirds for nothing. One bird that is most certainly not a snowbird is the Anna’s Hummingbird. It took effort to keep the feeder thawed and free from ice and snow but it was totally worth it to help the hummers through this extraordinarily harsh winter.

Before the big snowstorm I took time off from work to make it out to see the (normally east coast) Black-throated Blue Warbler that wintered in SW Portland.

Black-throated Blue Warbler (right)

Found just outside my 5mi radius. I have a new mission to figure out how to attract rarities to the yard.

One rare bird that did find it’s way to a local patch was a Bohemian Waxwing at Mt Tabor. I geared up in a snow-tire equipped Subaru to make it up there and search.

Icy stairs of doom

I arrived on the scene to find a birder who had just seen a bohemian fly overhead. Something I love-hate to hear. At least the bird was here, but I’d just missed an easy sighting. I made my way down the icy trail to check out hawthorne trees.

Where there are berries, there are birds. I found about 300-400 American Robins, a handful of Cedar Waxwings, and one blurry Bohemian Waxwing!

It happened so fast. The bird flew in, I tried to get my bearings, change my camera settings and it was gone. I searched and searched while my hands froze, then I finally found it again high up in the tree.

Pretty exciting. As I circled around to get a better view, a Sharp-shinned Hawk darted in and spooked all the birds away.

Kind of annoying for scaring the rarity, but also kind of awesome to see the hawk so close. I enjoyed the looks I got and called it a day.

On another snowy day I made it out to Smith and Bybee wetlands to tromp through snow and find a reported shrike. The park was “closed” which made it perfectly quiet and lovely.

The snow was deep, not “Larch Mtn deep“, but novel enough to still make it fun.

And since the ground was frozen it made it easier to access the normally marshy-flooded parts of the park. And that’s where I found it.

Northern Shrike! It tormented the poor juncos and sparrows that tried to drink water along the pond’s edge where the snow melted. Birds gotta do what a birds gotta do. I left the hunter in peace, happy I’d taken the chance to find it.

Back in my 5 mile radius at Whitaker Ponds I lucked out last weekend when I found Canvasback, Ruddy Duck, Common Goldeneye, and this sleepy Barred Owl.

Right where it’s supposed to be.

Each time I went around the 1/2 mi walking loop I found another species, so I kept going and on the third loop I heard an unusual song worth investigating. I was right because not long after, out popped a Hutton’s Vireo!

Gah. So cute. And not a Ruby-crowned Kinglet because of the song, but also the bill color (grey vs black) and the feet color (grey vs yellow). This is the first I’ve seen in Oregon (I saw one very briefly once in Washington). And precisely what makes the local patch thing so rewarding.

Now back at home I’ve geared up for spring. I’ve added a second seed feeder, new window hummingbird feeder, and a birdhouse that will hopefully make a chickadee couple very happy. We shall see.

Crowd-pleaser

Pledge of allegiance to the sugar-water

Home tweet home

And I picked up a “hum button” from the Backyard Birdship to try hand-feeding the hummers. It worked on the first try!

It’ll all be perfect once the ice melts. February has a lot to live up to!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Summer Birding

Last year I struggled with the reality that is summer birding is so slow. This year I feel more prepared and I’m appreciating the birds that are still around.

Robins are still here

American Robins are still here

One summer evening, Jen invited Tomas and I up to Larch Mountain to watch the Common Nighthawk show and we happily accepted.

Common Nighthawk watching

Common Nighthawk

Common Nighthawk

They swoop and dive through the air catching insects all the while calling, “peent, peent, peent.” Then in a courtship-territorial display they dive sharply toward the treetops with a “boom” noise from the friction of air passing through their wing feathers. It’s amazing! Especially when the booms and peents are right over your head.

We also saw an Aligator Lizard (neat to see a lizard on the west side of the Cascades!)

Alligator Lizard

And about 40 Band-tailed Pigeon. No joke. I photographed 1/40.

Band-tailed Pigeon

One mid-week sunny summer day I skipped work for a hike with Jen with near Mt Hood Meadows.

Mt Hood

Rumor was this hike comes with a side of Clark’s Nutcracker. I’d been on the lookout for CLNU since at least my Black Butte hike. Unfortunately, I dipped then, and I dipped on this day too. Not for lack of trying. Dang those birds.

Still, we had a lovely hike and enjoyed the birds that showed up, like Townsend’s Solitaire, Mountain Bluebird, Chipping Sparrow, Olive-sided Flycatcher, and Western Tanager.

Western Tanager

Followed by a lovely lunch buffet at Timberline Lodge. Rumor was Clark’s Nutcrackers frequent the lodge property. Unfortunately, not this day.

The following weekend, I decided to try my nutcracker luck again with my friend Kristen. Her boyfriend’s name is Clark, so I thought maaaaybe….yeah, that’s silly. Nevertheless, we hiked the four miles and looked but no such luck. But I was able to get a better look at the Elephant’s Head flower that Jen had spotted on the first go-round.

Elephant's head

Afterwards, Kristen and I headed to Timberline Lodge for the lunch buffet, because, why not? And it was Kristen’s first time at the lodge!

Low and behold, my lunch was delayed by a single Clark’s Nutcracker I spotted in the lodge parking lot.

scruffy111

It flew down and hopped along under the parked cars.

Clark's Nutcracker

Yep, dirty parking lot bird.

Clark's Nutcracker

I hiked over 12 miles through acres of wilderness, to end up finding the bird in a parking lot? The things a birder will go through for a lifer. Dang birds.

Clark's Nutcracker

So good and so bad. Is it fall yet?

Booms and peents,

Audrey

Tabor Time

I love Mt Tabor Park.

Tabor Park

Warblers love it too. And that’s what I’d come to see. Yay spring migration! Unfortunately for me, instead of seeing warblers I only heard most of them. I mean, yes, that’s still a good thing, but it can be maddening to hear something so beautiful and not match the sound to the bird. The few I did see, I failed to get decent photos of.

And to make matters worse, the only flycatchers I saw *weren’t* singing.

Why won't you let me love you?

Why won’t you say something?

I quickly remembered how hard warblering is. I tried to relax and slowly take it all in. I listened to the sounds of Cassin’s Vireo, Black-throated Gray Warbler, and Wilson’s Warblers while I watched American Robins, Brown-headed Cowbirds, and Lesser Goldfinch.

Early Bird

Early Bird

Brown-headed Cowbird

Brown-headed Bird

Drab Bird

Such a Drab Bird

MowTown Bird

MowTown Bird

I both heard and saw Band-tailed Pigeons. Always a treat up there.

Band-tailed Pigeon

And I spent a long time with these stationary Northern Flickers.

Northern Flicker

Northern Flicker

Sweet cheeks!

Sweet cheeks!

Northern Flicker

M’Lady

At least some birds were cooperative.

Another treat was finding a Chipping Sparrow!

Chipping Sparrow

We played peek-a-boo in the grass until it flew up and perched on a branch.

Chipping Sparrow

Eye Candy

Cool bird to find here. I hadn’t realized their trilling song sounds so similar to Dark-eyed Juncos, so I may have passed them up before.

I watched a Red-breasted Sapsucker hard at work on a bigleaf maple tree.

Red-breasted Sapsucker

And a Red-tailed Hawk hard at work hunting prey. Good bird.

Red-tailed Hawk

There were other people birding at the park, and with their help, I was lucky enough to see a Hermit Warbler for a brief moment, but sadly, no pics. The only warbler picture I got is this embarrassingly grainy, fuzzy picture of a Wilson’s Warbler. Oh well.

Wilson's Warbler

Maybe next time I’ll ask for directions.

The warblers went that way

The warblers went that way

In the mean time, I’ll keep looking and listening!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey