5MR booms and busts

It’s fall! The air is cooler, the leaves are changing colors, and shorebirds are on their way back south. There are only three months left to find 5MR birds this year. Since I’ve last checked in, I’ve had a few hits and misses. Many of the hits were at a place in Portland with terrible visibility, Vanport Wetlands.

Dear City of Portland, please install a viewing platform. Love, birders.

Sometimes you have to take what you can get. Here, I’ve gotten poor looks at Lesser Yellowlegs, a Solitary Sandpiper, and a Sora foraging in the open about 100 yards away.

Sora or Sasquatch?

The best bird of the bad looks club here was a Ruff! First Vanport record, this one was found and kindly shared by Colby Neuman.

So Ruff

I’ve also gotten bad looks of good birds at Broughton, like this Whimbrel found by Jay Withgott. To the right of the Whimbrel is a Sanderling, believe it or not.

Bird pixels

On a whole I have been very lucky in my 5MR and I’m really appreciating that lately, especially when it starts pouring rain as I move closer in to take a photo of a Red-necked Grebe.

And a Common Tern floats down to the beach right in front of me.

When it rains, it pours

And three cheers for cooperative peeps that stick around like this amazing American Golden-Plover found by Aaron Beerman.

Aaron also pointed out a small flock of Horned Lark, I’ve been waiting all year to see these! They were all Streaked Horned Lark, a subspecies of Horned Lark, endemic to the Pacific Northwest and under threatened status.

Banded! – stay tuned to hear back about this one

So many booms! Where are the busts, you ask? Well, there were more than a few birds reported in my 5MR that I didn’t see in time: Baird’s Sandpiper, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Short-billed Dowitcher, Yellow-breasted Chat, Hermit Warbler, Red-necked Phalarope, Common Nighthawk. To name a few. There’s always next year? But, honestly I can’t complain because I’ve found many other great birds, including a Parasitic Jaeger at Broughton Beach.

Boom

No wait, not just one jaeger. THERE. WERE. TWO!

Boom Boom! Who needs a boat?

This was on the same day I saw a Merlin, a Wilson’s Snipe, and I got the best looks of a Common Tern.

For the most part, we birders are at the mercy of luck, timing, and making choices. Hopefully good ones because we can’t be everywhere at once. It feels nice to be in the right place at the right time and be rewarded with jaegers, terns, and plovers (oh, my!). Last I looked I was at 189 species in my 5MR, it’ll be pretty tough to make it to my imaginary goal of 200 by the end of the year, but either way I’m pretty happy with the birds I’ve seen so far.

Still missing: Red-shouldered Hawk, Northern Pygmy-Owl, American Dipper, Sandhill Crane, White-winged Scoter, Eared Grebe, Red-breasted Merganser, some wintering rarities (?)

Booms and busts,

Audrey

Summer birding and a Red-headed Woodpecker

Summer birding is going as summer birding does. Slow. I’ve caught up on reading and done some yard work while I wait patiently for fall migration. This time of the year I volunteer with Cascades Pika Watch and visit my favorite talus-tater-friends, the American Pika.

Eeep!

One survey on Larch Mountain gave me a bonus Multnomah County Canada Jay.

Back in my 5-mile-radius I found a Green Heron in the Columbia Slough.

And a few shorebirds have started to trickle in at Broughton Beach. Western and Least Sandpipers have both been spotted on the shores.

Western (L), Least (R)

I finally saw my 5MR Caspian Tern.

And a surprise Bonaparte’s Gull in breeding plumage.

The Bonaparte’s was my 5MR bird #171. A couple of rarities showed up in my radius back in June, including a Great-tailed Grackle at Vanport (first county record?). I’ve wanted to see an GTGR in Oregon for a while now, and unfortunately I want to see a Great-tailed Grackle in Oregon again. The looks were barely diagnostic.

But it was followed by an Ash-throated Flycatcher, a really nice county bird and even better 5MR bird.

There’s been no shortage of baby birds this time of year.

Downy yard baby
Chestnut-backed chick-a-dee
White-crowned nugget
Brewer’s baby

And during one slow period I think I complained there was nothing I could chase that was convenient to my schedule. But then my friend Kayla found a Red-headed Woodpecker (!) on a Friday night. I had nothing planned for Saturday and no excuses. It would be a long drive to a random clear-cut on the Oregon Coast. And an even longer shot the bird would still be in the same place.

Kayla spotted the woodpecker as she and her husband were driving 60 mph along a highway near Reedsport. Two frantic u-turns later she confirmed she had seen a legit Red-headed Woodpecker (fourth Oregon record?). They normally occur east of the Rockies and this bird would be a lifer for me. Once I learned some friends were down for the chase I knew I’d be in good company either way it went so I had to give it a try.

I left early but behind schedule and behind a handful of other birders (including my friends Courtney, Caleb, Nick, and Maureen). I was still 20 minutes away when they texted that Maureen had refound the bird!! I did my best not to floor it and I arrived in time to high-five everyone.

And in time to see the woodpecker!! So dang lucky.

My photos do not do this handsome bird justice. It was much more striking in person.

We spent a little more time walking the highway pointing it out to new arrivals before saying our goodbyes to this awesome bird and continuing along. It was a beautiful day at the coast and I was happy to spend some time there. We went to Siltcoos River Estuary next to look at Snowy Plovers run along the sand and Marbled Murrelets (flying potatoes) over the water. No good photos of either unfortunately.

Then I was alerted to a Gray Catbird sighting at Ona Beach that same morning. It was an hour north and on the way home so it was the obvious next destination. We got to the location (the bushes by the bathroom) and Nick immediately spotted the bird. But sadly no one else could get on it in time so we waited. We ate lunch and waited a little longer entertained by a Swainson’s Thrush carrying food to a nearby nest.

Courtney and Caleb eventually had to take off. And then rest of us finally gave up. I walked back to the parking lot with Nick and Maureen but realized I should use the bathroom before getting back on the road. I hadn’t gotten far back by the restroom when birder Aaron Beerman and his parents waved me over, they’d just seen the catbird!

So I hurried over and didn’t see it. And continued not seeing it for about another 30 min. I gave up for a second (or third? I’ve lost track) time and was set to leave again when another birder, Bill Tice showed up. I told him the story, one person sees the bird then it’s gone for an hour but I figured I’d look with Bill for a few minutes anyways. Not long after we both saw it!!

Or barely saw it? The sneakiest catbird ever. Who knew that Red-headed Woodpeckers were easier to see than Gray Catbirds in Oregon! I’d spent way too much time waiting and finally left to get on the road to get home before dark. Summer birding fun!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

The best day in 5MR birding

It might be premature to call it, but I might have had my best 5MR birding day. It started early on Mt Tabor Park where I met up with Sarah, Eric, Laura, Dick, and a couple of Dick’s friend’s who were all up for finding some spring migrants. We barely got started when we heard a sharp “pip-pip-pip” that Sarah and Laura identified as Red Crossbills. Sweet, a new 5MR bird already!

We continued walking up the trail when Sarah looked up and said “What the hell is that?” You know it has to be good when that happens – indeed it was! There was a Short-eared Owl circling over Mt Tabor!!!

Unbelievable. The park is much more forest than grassland so this was highly unexpected. Maybe migrating over? It had a meal in its talons and looked like it was looking for a place to land. We never saw it land, but it circled around in the sky for quite some time.

This was not a new 5MR bird (I’d seen one near the airport in February), but it was a new park bird for me and one of the coolest things I’ve seen there. Everyone loves owls and this was a great start. We followed up by checking on the Great Horned Owl nest in the park that has a confirmed set of three (!) owlets! Tomas met up with us and took this great family portrait:

Other highlights were nesting Chestnut-backed Chickadees, Lesser Goldfinch, Bushtits and multiple warblers including Black-throated Gray, Orange-crowned, Townsend’s, and Nashville Warblers. They are the reason for the season.

We missed MacGillivray’s Warbler and Chipping Sparrow. I’d spent about 6 hours and 9 miles the day before birding Tabor hoping to bump into a Chipping Sparrow but no dice. So it was surprising to me when I got home to read someone had found one at the Fire Station near Broughton Beach. Birdmergency! I was tired but able so I went to look and surprisingly Tomas was game to join.

It was so easy. Right along the fence line, past the Killdeer and mixed in with Savannah Sparrows was a bright and appropriately chipper Chipping Sparrow.

Occasionally it hopped up and perched on the fence. I was so relieved (little did I know I’d find one in the park outside my work office a couple of weeks later).

We then got a text from a friend that the Tabor owlets were waking up, flapping and looking around and Tomas had only one more day with his rented 100-400mm lens so since there was still daylight left we returned to Tabor for a sunset with the owlets.

Not even dark yet, a parent brought in a large rat (!). Tomas captured the special moment:

The owlets fed, fat and happy settled down while we chatted with an older couple watching nearby. They asked us if we’d seen the screech owls in the neighborhood and mentioned there were “loads of them.” Outside I said “Oh, no I haven’t, that’s cute” while inside I was “WHAT?! WHERE!?!

Inspired by the day, Tomas and I decided to follow the lead and poke around the nearby neighborhood. One thing led to another and we ended up looking at whitewash under a suspect cedar tree. A couple of older ladies walked by noticing us and asked if we’d seen the owl yet. The lead got hotter. They pointed to a hole in a pergola to pay attention to and we waited.

Just after 8pm I saw an owl fly out of the cedar tree!!! I (silently) lost my mind and motioned to Tomas to look at a branch where it sat perched in an alder tree in someone’s backyard.

No freakin way. Then we heard a “bouncy ball” call and a second owl flew out of the hole!!!

What’s better than one owl? Loads of owls. Tomas took all the screech owl photos.

While I died and went to owl heaven. It has been my (4-year long) dream to find a Western Screech Owl on Tabor (which these owls were not exactly on), but close enough (for now). And it is positively in my 5MR leaving me jumping for joy. I’m so happy they are here.

Tomas and I visited them a second night and witnessed a prey exchange between the two owls leaving me hopeful they’ll raise another generation of adorable murder-muppets. Time will tell, but we’ll be sure to give the owls their space.

It’s the penultimate of 5MR birding! I think I can retire now.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey