No (R)egrets

A short while ago my friend Eric and I were doing some light, casual, local birding. We managed to find a Multnomah County Swamp Sparrow a new county bird for each of us (both #215!).

Then a report of a Cattle Egret came in. A week prior there was a report of one at Fernhill Wetlands that turned out to be a Great Egret. But this report seemed more plausible, “seen with 10 Great Egrets.” We didn’t see photos, but we also didn’t have a good reason not to try for it, so we went.

Two hours later we were on the side of Washburn Lane scratching our heads. Is that egret smaller? Maybe that one? None looked strikingly different. They were also difficult to see due to tall grass and poor light. Then two egrets flew and one looked “slightly smaller.” Sort of. See Eric’s photo of the egrets in this eBird checklist.

We left knowing we hadn’t seen a Cattle Egret, but we weren’t sure if the bird we saw was a female GREG (males can be 20% larger than females) or young egret or something else.

My only usable photo of egret sp. with nothing for scale

Turns out, this egret sparked debate that it could be an Intermediate Egret, a medium-sized egret that occurs from Africa to the Philippines. There has been a single confirmed occurrence of an Intermediate Egret (found deceased, blown in from a storm with 7 other egrets) in the Aleutian Islands on Buldir Island in 2006. So the likelihood of this bird being Intermediate is (sure, anything is possible) slim.

I feel it’s similar to the McKay’s Bunting “pale bird,” without a DNA sample we’ll never know for sure. To distinguish Intermediate from Great Egret, Oriental bird specialist Desmond Allen says “after the first 500-1000 you may start to see the differences more easily.” Sounds like a fun (painful) I.D. exercise. I didn’t know Intermediates existed before this, but for now I’m leaving this one as egret sp.

Eric and I gave up egretting to take another look at the Tundra Bean-Goose nearby at Finley NWR. Eric spotted the goose easily and we got the best looks yet.

By then it was nearing dusk so we left to look for Short-eared Owls at Prairie Overlook. We saw two! Along with Red-shouldered Hawk, Rough-legged Hawk, and distant looks at a White-tailed Kite. Excellent consolation birds all of which I took terrible photos of.

Guess who

Four days later another Cattle Egret report came in. What?! This time I waited to see photos and sure enough, James Billstine had found two in Tillamook! It was noon and I was at work, but I knew if I left immediately I could make it before dark.

Finally, real Cattle Egrets! Distant looks, but still a good reminder how tiny they are compared to Great Egrets. No question about these (state year bird #319!). Maybe someday these two will make even more Cattle Egrets in Oregon.

No regrets.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Curry County

I’d survived a pelagic trip and a night in the dorms. I was five hours from home and ready for my next adventure. It was the perfect time to visit Curry County, one of the counties in Oregon I’d never previously birded in.

This is my favorite kind of birding. New county, all new birds, no schedule and completely on my own agenda. I could sit for hours looking for sparrows if I wanted to. And of course I did want to. There were reports of Clay-colored Sparrows in the area so I had good reason. I spent a lot of time at Arizona Beach State Recreation Site.

My favorite sighting started with a soft warbling song I heard through the trees and brush. I thought it might be a catbird, but eventually I caught sight of the little songster.

An American Dipper! There was only a tiny portion of stream flowing and it was right above it singing its little heart out. I may have melted.

Back at the pond across the highway there were two Blue-winged Teal best identified as they’re flying away.

And many unmistakable Black Phoebe.

I got a good look at this young Red-shouldered Hawk looking for a meal.

And on the way out I saw a HUGE flock of California Quail.

“Chicaaaaagoooooo!”

I saw a few sparrows.

Golden, golden, song, white-crowned, golden

But it took a many tries to get this blurry photo of a Chipping Sparrow.

To find shorebirds it was suggested I try out Floras Lake, especially at the end of the trail by Floras Creek through the grassy dunes.

It was beautiful. But unfortunately both times I visited winds were blowing 20+mph.

Reenactment at Cape Blanco State Park

Not ideal shorebirding conditions. So instead I drove farther south to Gold Beach “where the Pacific meets the Rogue” and where I met a few birds like this bright Yellow Warbler.

Still no shorebirds or terns I could find, but eventually I spotted a sparrow flock that looked interesting. Indeed.

Clay-colored Sparrow!

It looks similar to Chipping Sparrows but has pale lores and is more buffy. They’re an unusual treat to see in Oregon and I was thrilled to see this one.

Back in Port Orford I stayed at the Castaway By the Sea Motel that has thin walls but excellent views.

In the bay below I found Common Murre, a few gulls, and three types of loons that I’ve included all together in one convenient photo.

The largest-billed loon on far left is a Common Loon, the one in the middle with the chin strap is a Pacific Loon, and on far right with the upturned bill is a Red-throated Loon (not to scale). If only they would always swim together like this.

Such good times. I left Curry County having seen 70 species! On the way home I stopped at Cape Arago State Park in Coos County for Harlequin Ducks.

And I re-visited Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge for White-tailed Kites that were missed during the shorebird festival. They were very distant but there were two!

Bringing me to 101 species in Coos County. Not bad. And because there are a lot of places to stop in the four hours from before home, I decided to stick with the shorebird theme and visit the American Avocet at Finley National Wildlife Refuge.

If this isn’t a shorebird festival, I don’t know what is.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Texas: Sabal Palm to Popsicles

On this morning we got up early to head southeast of Brownsville to the Sabal Palm Sanctuary, a 557 ac. nature preserve located in a bend of the Rio Grande. With more than 5 miles of nature trails surely we’d see some good stuff.

Off to a sweaty start, we traveled through the park listening to a chorus of birds including this Long-billed Thrasher.

Along the boardwalks we heard White-eyed Vireo and warblers including Wilson’s and Black-throated Green. Unfortunately, I have no photographic proof. Finding warblers and vireos in Texas is similar to another fun game: Find That Texas Creature.

Here’s an example. Do you see what I see?

How about this one? Difficulty level 9/10. Not just Spanish moss.

See? Fun. Especially with creatures that won’t kill you. There are lots of spiders in Texas. Most made their presence known. Like the (harmless) Garden Spider that makes a great web with a knit sweater patterned center (stabilimentum).

Good stuff indeed. But we were also still looking for new birds.

Ladder-backs live here

We found Ladder-backed Woodpecker in the forests and White-tipped Dove, Plain Chachalacas, and Buff-bellied Hummingbirds near the feeders.

Buff-bellied or beer-bellied?

Perched in one a tree was a Broad-winged Hawk while soaring above us in the skies were Turkey and Black Vultures. A little lower was a White-tailed Kite.

Texas birds were becoming more familiar. Of course it wasn’t until we returned to the parking lot when we finally found one of our main target birds. Way up in a palm tree next to the 1892 historic Rabb Plantation House.

Was a 2017 Hooded Oriole!

Orange bird, white on shoulder, curved bill, black bib. Studying on the plane paid off. It was a nice send-off before we left for our next destination, the South Padre Island jetty. We made a good attempt but found more spring-breakers on the scene then birds.

Birders gone wild

This meant it was taco time before next making a return trip to the free boardwalks at the SPI Convention Center Nature Trail.

Back on the boardwalks we went to work birding with the intensity of a Tricolored Heron.

Or Green Heron.

Well, some of us wandered.

Hey, where ya going?

But it’s a good thing because that’s how Sarah found the best least surprise a Least Bittern!

And a Clapper Rail! Out in the open. Basically. Find that Texas bird!

Afterwards we all wandered back to the airbnb where we found a sweet surprise. A Buff-bellied Hummingbird had found the feeder we put out. Success!

Followed by an almost equally sweet post-birding treat, beer and popsicles!

Because we’re adults. Birders gone wild!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey