Michigan- Yard Birds

After 7 years together it was time I finally met my boyfriend’s family. NBD. We’d just take a red-eye flight to Detroit, Michigan and hang out with everyone for a week. His niece Kellie was having a graduation party so it was a good time to make the trip.

His parents’ back yard was awesome. His mom had bird feeders out, so I knew we’d get along. I spent the majority of my time at the house either outside or staring out the back patio window. It was pretty great.

Cardinal through the window

House Sparrow and Northern Cardinal

The porch was often covered in Downy Woodpeckers.

Hi, welcome to Michigan

In the yard were Chipping Sparrows and Michigan’s state bird, the American Robin.

Young ones learning to fly and older pros taking their worm for a walk.

Not a statue

I explored the neighborhood and found Cedar Waxwing, American Goldfinch, Tufted Titmouse.

A Blue Jay at the playground.

And a pair of dreamy Eastern Bluebirds.

I looked up to see a Chimney Swift! They look a heck of a lot like Vaux’s Swifts back home.

Sometimes the weather wasn’t the best, it was warm, muggy, and often raining making it better to stay dry indoors watching the feeders.

Downy Woodpecker

Blue Jay

White-breasted Nuthatch

Red-bellied Woodpecker

I got brief glimpses of a female hummingbird, but sadly no photos. The only one it could be this time of year is a Ruby-throated Hummingbird.

There was also a backyard flycatcher that I think is an Eastern Phoebe. I’m still working through my Michigan flycatchers.

The best bird in the yard was shy and only flashed an occasional orange in the bushes.

It took a while, but eventually enough of the bird popped out to identify it as a Baltimore Oriole!

Note the all-black hood and orange on the outer tail feathers. A mystery I was happy to have solved. It was such a peaceful and quiet backyard I could hang out there for hours.

Tomas and I went outside at night but didn’t hear any owls or nightjars as I’d hoped, instead we saw fireflies! I haven’t seen those since I lived in Virginia in the early 2000s. Made me wish I’d brought my night-photography setup, check out these cool photos of firefly timelapses.

Next time Michigan!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Fall Mountain Fire Lookout

Staying in a fire lookout is as cool as it sounds. Several lookouts in Oregon are available for rent but are incredibly popular and hard to get into. Tomas and I were lucky enough to snag his coworker’s reservation for Fall Mountain Fire Lookout when he couldn’t go. We happily drove 5 hours east to the Malheur National forest to stay for two nights.

The views were stunning. And the lookout was fully equipped with a stove, fridge, and even a heater.

What more could you ask for?

The surrounding forest was equipped with birds. Regulars were a pair of Mountain Bluebirds.

That would sometimes pick bugs out of the fire pit. We didn’t make a fire so it was okay.

One of the first birds I saw were Cassin’s Finch, one a juvenile begging for food.

Gross-cool.

It took me forever to I.D. this Dusky Flycatcher as it flicked it’s long tail, and called Chirrit, brrk, chirreet. Not the easiest flycatcher to I.D. but I powered through.

Luckily, there were easier birds, like this Green-tailed Towhee.

Songsters included a Townsend’s Warbler that I never did see, and Yellow-rumped Warblers that were much more conspicuous.

A Hermit Thrush made a brief appearance.

One morning I drove to a burn location to see if I could find some woodpeckers. I found three (!) White-headed Woodpeckers.

Two Black-backed Woodpeckers.

And a pair of Hairy Woodpeckers.

At the burn location was also House Wren feeding young, Chipping Sparrows, Dark-eyed Junco, White-breasted Nuthatch, and a surprise pair of Rufous Hummingbirds.

When it warmed up in the afternoons, I returned to the lookout where Tomas and I would lay in hammocks in the breeze.

It was pretty relaxing, and I could watch birds at the same time, like this pair of Western Tanager.

In the evenings, from the deck we watched Common Nighthawks soar in the sky.

It really was a spectacular show. And even better watching from eye-level.

Despite the distance getting to the lookout, the obnoxious motorcyclists that couldn’t read the “Do Not Disturb the Guests” sign, and those stairs that were scary as hell, it was all totally worth it for the experience.

Especially worth it for the sunsets from bed. Gorgeous stuff!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

An excellent week of birds

It started when I left work early one day to find a rare Snowy Egret in the Vancouver Lake Lowlands that was associating with a Great Egret and Mallard decoy.

Also present were Greater Yellowlegs, a couple of hardy Tree and Barn Swallows, and Purple Finch, a year bird I was happy to see lower in the branches.

On the way out a flash of black and white caught my eye.

Ah, yes. Migration was in full swing as Snow Geese, Cackling Geese, and Sandhill Cranes came and went. I pulled over to take a look.

It was hard to pull myself away.

The following weekend I was excited to join Sarah and Max for some Oregon county birding. We went south on I-5 to Talking Waters Gardens, a place I’ve never birded before located in Linn County.

It was fantastic water treatment-wetland habitat full of American Wigeon, Hooded Merganser, Virginia Rails, and even one vocal Sora (my first Oregon Sora!). No visuals of the Sora, unfortunately, but we did locate three Black Phoebe.

1/3 phoebes

 Several Lincoln Sparrows.

And a moderately cooperative White-throated Sparrow hanging out in a corner of the ponds.

It was still early in the day when we completed the trails so we drove north making a quick stop at Waverly Park where we found a couple of Western Gulls and a FOY Green Heron. Then it was onward to Ankeny National Wildlife to (officially) add birds in Marion County which included distant Dusky Canada Geese with red neck collars.

And muddy-faced swans.

Not making it easy to ID

Luckily there were a couple with visible yellow lores helping to confidently ID them as the more expected, Tundra Swans.

We also stopped at the Rail Trail on the refuge to walk on a boardwalk through Oregon Ash wetlands.

The water was so high it reminded me a bit of Florida’s wetlands but without the moss and humidity. Along the trail we found more Black Phoebe, White-breasted Nuthatch, Downy Woodpecker, and Max heard a Red-breasted Sapsucker that we eventually spotted right at the water’s edge.

Not something you see every day.

The next morning I got up before dawn to chase a sea duck. There’d been a report of a female Steller’s Eider at Seaside Cove on the Oregon coast but I had an appointment with a tree-trimmer at 12:30pm so I didn’t have any time to waste. I left the house at 5am and arrived at Seaside when it was still dark. Luckily, there were already two birders there making me feel totally normal.

One was Trent Bray, avid birder and shop owner of Bobolink, a birding (disc golf, and beer) supply store in La Grande, Oregon. Trent had left La Grande at 1am that morning but it paid off because he already had the bird in the scope. We watched it dive and ride the waves drifting out farther as more birders arrived on scene.

The bird became harder to locate in the waves and we felt a bit bummed. But then the eider flew right back to us. Hooray!

What a good duck. We all cheered and took hundreds of photos. The blocky head, the pale eye-ring, and two white wing bars were clearly visible on this first-winter female bird. She was cooperative, clearly not minding the attention. Or the surfers.

Surfer, surfer, eider, scoter combo

Steller’s Eiders are listed as threatened and rarely found outside of Alaska. This is only Oregon’s fourth record.

I was giddy and thrilled I’d taken time to come visit her. And because it was so easy, I had at least 10 more minutes to look for a Palm Warbler at a nearby water treatment plant (thanks for the tip, Sarah!).

Success! I found it with minimal difficulty though it didn’t want to be seen. A warbler less cooperative than a rare sea duck, go figure. Running out of time I dashed the two hours home and made it within minutes of meeting the arborist. Winning.

Not far from the house on another day I found the Greater White-fronted Geese frequenting the golf course by Force Lake, and in a tree next to the parking lot a Sharp-shinned Hawk practicing being ferocious.

This one had perfected the stink-eye.

And on another local outing at Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge I attempted to find a Red-shouldered Hawk. I’d unknowingly walked right by it until I spotted a Red-tailed Hawk that ignited the fire in the Red-shouldered and it vocalized loudly and chased its competition away.

Birding has been good to me this month. To say the least. Next month might be a different story, but more about that later. Until then, I’m enjoying everything I can get!

And that includes my FOY-yard Townsend’s Warbler!

Back and cute as ever.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey