Trogon Trip: Paton House

The Paton House deserves its own post. It was started by generous homeowners, Wally and Marion Paton who loved birds and set up feeders, a chalk board for sightings, and invited birders to their yard beginning in 1973. After their passing, the property was picked up by Tucson Audubon to preserve the scenic location as a haven for birds and birders alike. It warms my heart that such a place like this exists.

We made three visits in our five days in Patagonia and we saw 45 species, including lifers for all of us. And we closed the place down each time we went. It was that good.

At the Hummingbird feeders were Anna’s, Broad-billed, and my lifer Violet-crowned Hummingbird.

On the suet in the trees were gobs of Yellow-rumped Warblers,White-breasted Nuthatch, and Ladder-backed Woodpeckers. Sometimes all at once.

On the thistle was an out of season American Goldfinch, Pine Siskin, and Lesser Goldfinch, including one of the “Texas” varieties with much more black on its back.

The seed feeders (surprisingly) attracted Lazuli Buntings.

And one evening, my lifer female Blue Grosbeak shyly came out for a visit.

In the brush piles below were White-crowned Sparrows, Lincoln’s Sparrows, Chipping sparrows, and Rufous-winged Sparrows.

That totally didn’t look like Chipping Sparrows. Nope, not at all.

Gambel’s Quail would call “pup waay pop, pup waay pop” as they scratched around in the dirt and perched on brush piles.

Like clockwork in the evening a female Pyrrhuloxia would cautiously join the other ground feeders for a snack. We spent enough time here to get to know some of the regular birds and their habits.

One time Sarah spotted a pair of Inca Doves near a brush pile, they are so tiny, they made the White-winged Doves look like behemoths.

In the skies above Max spotted (his and Sarah’s lifer!) a Gray Hawk circling above. (I’d seen one once before in Texas).

And on our last day, with no other expected life birds on the horizon, Max left to get something out of the car then came running back to alert Sarah and I because he thought he’d seen a Zone-tailed Hawk mixed in with the Turkey Vultures in the sky! Sure enough!

Totally not a Turkey Vulture

Life bird for all of us! It was a very lucky sighting. And a very lovely time at Paton House.

Thank you Wally and Marion.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Winter adventures

January was a good month of birding. Outside my 5MR Philip Kline spotted a Harlequin Duck near Eagle Creek Fish Hatchery in the Gorge, it would be a county bird for me and I thought it would make a great mini-adventure for Tomas and I.

Most of the trails and roads are still closed in the Columbia River Gorge thanks to the 2017 Eagle Creek Fire (started by a teenager setting off fireworks during a burn ban). The highway exit to the fish hatchery is closed but I did some research and found that portions of the bike trail bordering the highway in the gorge are open giving us an easy 3 mile ride from Cascade Locks to Eagle Creek.

Once at Eagle Creek It didn’t take long to spot the lovely brown Harlequin Duck diving near a bend in the river.

It was such a nice time. I spent two hours wedged between some rocks by the river watching the harlequin, goldeneyes, and a pair of American Dippers singing, bobbing, and displaying to one another.

The sweetest

Back in my 5MR I’ve explored some new and old patches. I added two new species to Holladay Park next to my office, a flyover Great Egret and Red-breasted Sapsucker.

Now showing at Holladay Park

I lucked out with a good gull mix at the Downtown Waterfront Park including Ring-billed, California, and a nice Western Gull, slightly more challenging to find away from the coast.

Western Gull and city friends

Another foggy morning I finally made it to Tabor Park this year where I found a Barred Owl hidden deep in the cedar trees.

I texted my friend Eric who biked over to share in the fun. He and I have a good deal of 5MR overlap that can be very convenient. I shared the owl and he returned the favor by finding a nicely perched magical Merlin. Win-win.

We birded by bike together another day, exploring our friendly neighborhood sloughs and found Hermit Thrush, White-breasted Nuthatch, and a Hairy Woodpecker that was an excellent and unexpected 5MR bird for us.

Hairy Woodpecker

A few 5MR parks in Vancouver overlap with Jen’s radius, and she’s been lucky enough to see an American Dipper twice at Biddle Lake inspiring me to cross over and check it out. I’ve yet to refind the 5MR dipper but I did find a nice Pacific Wren.

And my FOY Orange-crowned Warbler! Always a warm winter sight.

Along the Washington side of the Columbia River at Marine Park I saw a nice group of Barrow’s Goldeneye.

And the best was refinding a rare Tufted Duck this past weekend originally found by Jim Danzenbaker at Wintler Park.

Lucky duck

On a return trip from Washington I detoured towards Broughton Beach to look for Short-eared Owls but I didn’t need to go far because as I drove by the airport boundary fence along Marine Drive I did a double-take. Short-eared Owl!

So many good 5MR birds! I’m currently up to 100 species so far this year which sounds like a lot, but it’s still just 69% of the total species seen in Multnomah County.

Bird #100 was a Wilson’s Snipe that Eric and I flushed from the grass at Whitaker Ponds. Unfortunately, it happened too fast for photos. So instead, here’s bird #85 a Townsend’s Warbler that showed up to the yard after I put out homemade suet.

I’m having a lot of fun with mini-adventures in my 5MR, I’ve biked more than I have in a long time and I’ve only had a few pangs of FOMO (fear of missing out). I’m trying to do things differently this year, not that I’m done chasing everything, but I’m pulling back some (until I buy that Prius) (kidding not kidding).

Good 5MR birding.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Michigan- Yard Birds

After 7 years together it was time I finally met my boyfriend’s family. NBD. We’d just take a red-eye flight to Detroit, Michigan and hang out with everyone for a week. His niece Kellie was having a graduation party so it was a good time to make the trip.

His parents’ back yard was awesome. His mom had bird feeders out, so I knew we’d get along. I spent the majority of my time at the house either outside or staring out the back patio window. It was pretty great.

Cardinal through the window

House Sparrow and Northern Cardinal

The porch was often covered in Downy Woodpeckers.

Hi, welcome to Michigan

In the yard were Chipping Sparrows and Michigan’s state bird, the American Robin.

Young ones learning to fly and older pros taking their worm for a walk.

Not a statue

I explored the neighborhood and found Cedar Waxwing, American Goldfinch, Tufted Titmouse.

A Blue Jay at the playground.

And a pair of dreamy Eastern Bluebirds.

I looked up to see a Chimney Swift! They look a heck of a lot like Vaux’s Swifts back home.

Sometimes the weather wasn’t the best, it was warm, muggy, and often raining making it better to stay dry indoors watching the feeders.

Downy Woodpecker

Blue Jay

White-breasted Nuthatch

Red-bellied Woodpecker

I got brief glimpses of a female hummingbird, but sadly no photos. The only one it could be this time of year is a Ruby-throated Hummingbird.

There was also a backyard flycatcher that I think is an Eastern Phoebe. I’m still working through my Michigan flycatchers.

The best bird in the yard was shy and only flashed an occasional orange in the bushes.

It took a while, but eventually enough of the bird popped out to identify it as a Baltimore Oriole!

Note the all-black hood and orange on the outer tail feathers. A mystery I was happy to have solved. It was such a peaceful and quiet backyard I could hang out there for hours.

Tomas and I went outside at night but didn’t hear any owls or nightjars as I’d hoped, instead we saw fireflies! I haven’t seen those since I lived in Virginia in the early 2000s. Made me wish I’d brought my night-photography setup, check out these cool photos of firefly timelapses.

Next time Michigan!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey