The 300 Club

It’s been my goal to see 300 species this year in Oregon since I realized in September I’d already seen 292. If you’re thinking, “how the hell did she do that?” I wondered the same thing. My total Oregon life list is 337 and I had ankle surgery in February. But then I remembered birding like a maniac in January. I saw a Virginia’s Warbler, Northern Mockingbird, and a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker all on January 1.

And my awesome friends took me to see a Sabine’s Gull in Salem while I was on crutches, and on a trip east for Wasco County birding. Post surgery there was that trip south to Summer Lake. Then local rarities showed up; Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Ruff, and Sharptailed Sandpiper. And now two pelagic trips. It all starts to add up. Maybe some day I’ll do a real Oregon Big Year, but for now unintentional is good. Birds have been my therapy this year while recovering. Apparently I’ve needed a lot of therapy!

Now on the mend I was also on a post-pelagic high Sunday sitting at 299 birds with an entire day to bird on the coast. What would be #300?! What was even left? Well, there’s a lot of grouse (of course); Ruffed Grouse, Mountain Quail, but I’d have a better shot at Pygmy Owl, Rock Sandpiper, or Tropical Kingbird. All excellent candidates.

It was too dark to hang around Newport when I got up, so instead I drove to Nestucca Bay NWR. Luckily the gate was open pre-dawn when I arrived. Still no geese yet in the lower farm fields, so I took the gravel road to the top. No grouse on the way (of course). I walked along Two Rivers Nature Trail for a short ways remembering not to overdo it.

It didn’t take long to find birds. There were Pacific Wren, kinglets, and a Northern Harrier but the best birds were a small group of Canada Jays!

Friends without borders.

Not a year bird, but a fun Tillamook County bird and a great species to find on the coast.

I decided to look for rockpipers next at Barview Jetty Park. But blowing wind and rain didn’t keep me there long. It was time to head inland to the Nehalem Wastewater Treatment Plant. The facilities are closed to birders on weekends, but pro-tip you can scope the ponds from the top of the driveway!

I picked up a couple more county birds here, including Ruddy Duck.

And an Eared Grebe.

In a far pond I saw a tiny gull with a black “ear” spot, a Bonaparte’s Gull!

Another solid county bird. From here I drove along random farm roads in the area hoping to see a kingbird reported several days prior. It started pouring rain when I spotted it. No way. Oregon year bird #300! Tropical Kingbird!

Not so tropical kingbird

It is a large flycatcher, with a big bill and yellow up to the throat. It lacks white outer tail feathers that Western Kingbirds have. Eventually I got a photo of this bird’s lemon belly.

So lemony

I parked off the road to watch it flycatch for a while letting the experience sink in. So much love. A pair of Black Phoebes were much less appreciative of the kingbird than I.

Occasionally the bird flew into the trees and disappeared which probably explains why I’ve missed them before.

They’re much easier to see when perched on wires.

The sun came out blinding any more good looks and backlighting the bird so I took a break back to the water treatment ponds. I didn’t make it far before a flock of geese stopped me.

Most were Cackling Geese, but I did see a few Greater White-fronted Geese mixed in.

And I noticed some of a the cacklers had a white neck-ring suggesting they might be of the (once endangered now recoveringAleutian variety.

But I’ve learned not all cacklers with white collars are Aleutian subspecies. The bird with the dark glossy breast is likely Ridgway’s and the right bird could be Aleutian but the head shape isn’t quite right (thanks to Dave Irons for his geesepertise). So kind of like gulls, there’s some geese that don’t fit neatly into categories. Cackling sp. it is.

Back at the ponds there were even fewer birds than before probably due to the pair of Bald Eagles in the trees above. So I took a victory lap back to the kingbird to see if it was in better light but I wasn’t able to refind it. So long #300 be well.

I started home and met up with Sarah and Max along the way for victory beers and pizza and Sarah gave me the best gift!

Cheers to 300 amazing Oregon birds!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Texas: Salineño to The End

The last couple of days in Texas began with finding as many birds as possible at the Harlingen Thicket.

This meant hanging with Harris’s Hawks.

Watching Great Kiskadees collect nesting material.

And finally getting a good look at a Tropical Kingbird (best distinguished by Couch’s by voice).

One bird I was thrilled to get even a b-rated photo of was the White-eyed Vireo. I had too many missed photo-ops with this one.

There were few target birds we hadn’t seen by now. The nemeses of the trip, if you will, would have to be a small kingfisher, the Green Kingfisher, and Verdin, a bird that looks like a Bushtit with a yellow head. Several near misses, but we didn’t find either of these at the thicket either.

But we did see Texas Spiny Lizards humping.

And giant spiders.

It was late afternoon at this point and time for Sarah, Max, and Eric to catch their flight back to Portland. We bid them farewell and figured out our next plan. Jen and I had one more day to explore and we aimed to make the most of it. We drove two hours west to Salineño, a tiny town of Texas along the Rio Grande with a population of only 201 people.

We didn’t see any people (not even border patrol), but we did see plenty of birds, including three specialties, the Red-billed Pigeon, White-collared Seedeater, and Audubon’s Oriole. We thought the pigeons would be difficult, but they were actually quite easy.

Pretty perched pigeons.

We saw another intriguing bird perched farther in the distance, a Gray Hawk!

Worth crossing the scrubby desert full of ticks for a closer look.

Along the way we saw the White-collared Seedeater, a species that had a sharp population decline in the mid-70s, but has recently made a slight rebound.

Glad we got a look at this hard working bird.

Hiking farther along the dunes we passed Olive Sparrows.

And the “Texas form” Lesser Goldfinch that has way more black than other varieties.

I also heard a slow whistled song that perked me right up (I recognized it from the movie!), the Audubon’s Oriole! The only one we saw of the entire trip.

We also got a quick fly-by from a Green Kingfisher and I got terribly blurry photos of a Verdin. Not satisfactory sightings, but they happened. Another thing that happened was the Gray Hawk flew right by us next to the river.

This was a special place. And more like the birding trips I’m used to, wandering around bumping into all sorts of great new birds. We had such a fun time exploring, but at some point we knew it was time to make the long drive back to San Antonio to catch our plane home. Of course we stopped along the way.

For my last Scissor-tailed flycatcher of the trip. And the best views of a Pyrrhuloxia.

A stop for nesting Cave Swallows.

And for all the dead things (including a bobcat *cries*).

The best stop was for Jen to save this turtle from crossing the big, mean highway.

Texas was incredible. I saw an 72 lifers! And had the best time with a bunch of birders gone wild.

There’s no better way to party.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey