Painted Hills II

Tomas and I left the Ochoco National Forest and continued our exploration of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument area.

Pronghorn

Successfully spooking deer and herds of pronghorn along the way.

Pronghorn

Pronghorn

Come back!

Along HWY 19 we pulled over to check out Cathedral Rock.

rock2

Cathedral Rock

While admiring the magnificent colors of the cliff walls, we heard harsh croaking monster screams and looked over hesitantly to see what the racket was. A Great Blue Heron rookery! Of course.

Great Blue Heron

There were three nests full of noisy monster muppet babies. We watched them for a while enjoying the show. Tomas says this was one of his favorite parts of the trip. Yessss.

Great Blue Heron

Great Blue Heron

Watching these primordial looking (and sounding) birds with the ancient towering cliffs in the background was remarkable. A very cool moment.

Continuing along, We saw several other bird species including:

Western Kingbird

Western Kingbird

Red-tailed Hawk (rufous morph)

Red-tailed Hawk (rufous morph)

Swainson's Hawk (dark morph)

Swainson’s Hawk (dark morph)

Northern Rough-winged Swallow

Northern Rough-winged Swallow

Violet-green Swallow

Violet-green Swallow

And we even manged to spot American White Pelicans in a pond near Ochoco Reservoir.

American White Pelican

American White Pelican

We spent our last night camping at Shelton Wayside County Park in Wheeler County. For camping over a holiday weekend, it wasn’t as horrible as I’d feared. We found a semi-secluded spot, settled in and enjoyed the warm spring evening listening to the symphony of pine cones popping open.

Of course I couldn’t sit still for too long, so I wandered down an old abandoned highway and heard Western Tanager, Lazuli Bunting, and Chipping Sparrows. And I spotted  a Say’s Phoebe on a powerline.

Say's Phoebe

Then I saw a second Say’s Phoebe.

Say's Phoebe

I sat down and watched as one grabbed a large insect expertly out of the air.

Say's Phoebe

It sat perched on the wire, calling its low, whistled sad-sounding “pit-tsee-eur” over and over again. I thought, why aren’t you eating the bug, weirdo? Then I looked over to the building on the right.

Say's Phoebe nest

Ohhhhh. That’s why. I backed further away then not wanting to stress out the bird. It didn’t want to give away the nest location! Good bird. Eventually the chicks got fed.

Say's Phoebe

So amazing! Spring is the best.

Leaving the campground the next morning, we made our way to our last stop, the Clarno Unit.

Clarno Unit

We walked along the paths, looking at the fossilized leaves in the rocks, and imagined how different this place was millions of years ago.

Signage

Incredible. Then we looked up to see White-throated Swifts performing courtship displays! They paired up, clung to one another, and fell, swirling incredibly fast towards the ground. At the last second before impact, they separated and flew off in different directions. One of the coolest bird displays I’ve seen yet.

White-throated Swift

A swift swift

It’s like they gave us the fireworks-grand finale display of the desert. But wait, there’s more!

Rock Wren

Rock Wren

Ash-throated Flycatcher

Ash-throated Flycatcher

Black-tailed Jackrabbit

Black-tailed Jackrabbit

Gopher Snake (also known as bull snake)

Gopher Snake (also known as bull snake)

Western Fence Lizard

Western Fence Lizard

Who says the desert is barren?

Full of life

Full of life

Fan of the desert

End of trail

After visiting the painted hills, I’m officially a fan of the desert. Five out of five stars and the cactus agrees.

Chirps,

Audrey

Malheur Matters

I have been a busy birder this spring.

Two weeks ago, I joined Portland Audubon on a highly anticipated trip to Harney County to visit Malheur National Wildlife. It was my first time traveling to this part of southeastern Oregon, and the first time the area opened since the illegal occupation. I was so excited not just to see thousands of migrating birds, but to support Harney County, show love for public lands, and to be part of a positive influence in the area.

Map holding

Our fearless birdy leaders

We were greeted with mixed reviews from the locals. On one side was the biker gang yelling obscenities at us, and people in big, loud trucks passing aggressively and flipping us off.

Gate sign visible from public road. Photo by Ellen Lewis; Portland, Oregon.

Gate sign visible from public road. Photo by Ellen Lewis; Portland, Oregon.

But that was just the first day. On the other side were welcome signs, friendly hellos, and locals with an obvious sense of humor.

Welcome birders

Welcome

Humor

Thank you, good-humored landowner. (Black-necked Stilts behind the flamingos!)

Despite the local tension, we nature-lovers piled into two vans (that we named White-rumped Yeti and Bobwhite), traveled and explored Harney County over three days, spread the bird love and had an amazing time. I think we represented birders well. Here are some highlights:

Ferruginous Hawk

Ferruginous Hawk. We saw two, and a nest!

Van-birding - something good on the right!

Van-birding – lean right! Photo by Linda “Zelda” Saari; Portland, Oregon.

Swainson's Hawk (dark morph), moments before was exchanged with a Rough-legged Hawk

Swainson’s Hawk (dark morph) that had moments before swapped places with a Rough-legged Hawk.

Sage-birding

Sage-birding

Vesper Sparrow

Vesper Sparrow

Burrowing Owl

Burrowing Owl (!)

Good Birders

Good Birders

Ross's Geese

50% of the world’s population of Ross’s Geese stop here.

Long-billed Curlew

Long-billed Curlews on every corner

At one point, we watched two (amorous) American Avocets interact in a mating display. They washed each other’s head, swooping water up, then she shook her head “no-no-no”, and he hopped on top. Seconds later they divided and quickly went their separate ways.

American Avocet

Such a pretty bird

Such a pretty bird

It was almost as romantic as watching Sandhill Cranes dance. Almost. Spring love was clearly in the air. Or at least hormones were. One of the most magical moments of the trip was an evening spent watching two Great Horned Owls hoot, nod, and bow, courting each other under the moonlight. Now that’s romantic. Fun-filled video here.

Great Horned Owl

What an experience.

Birders at Buena Vista Ponds Overlook

Birders at Buena Vista Ponds Overlook

Malheur is a vital habitat area to birds and wildlife. Threatened in 1898 by ignorant plume hunters, its preservation importance was officially recognized in 1908, when Theodore Roosevelt gave the executive order, establishing Lake Malheur Reservation.

It’s part of an inland lake system on the Pacific Flyway called the SONEC (Southern Oregon-Northeastern California), and millions of birds stop here during migration, and many, including 20% of North America’s entire breeding population of Cinnamon Teal, use this wetland complex to nest and breed.

Today, collaborative groups work hard to manage this vast landscape for wildlife and visitor usage. [Learn more: watch Portland Audubon Conservation Director, Bob Sallinger’s presentation, Malheur National Wildlife Refuge: Past, Present and Future.]

This trip was not just about seeing my first Black-crowned Night Heron or Yellow-headed Blackbird.

Black-crowned Night Heron

Not a plastic bag

But both of those things happened.

Forest-birding, Idlewild Campground

Forest-birding, Idlewild Campground

It wasn’t just about the bluebirds, pronghorn, or Say’s phoebe.

Mountain Bluebird

Mountain Bluebird

Pronghorn

Pronghorn

Say's Phoebe

Say’s Phoebe

This trip was about appreciating public lands. As much as the birds need this habitat to live, we need these lands to thrive too.

Birders

Happy travelers. Photo by Ellen Lewis; Portland, Oregon.

Since I first heard about Malheur (on day two of birding), and now that I’ve visited, I feel super protective of it. Protective of all our public lands. I’m incredibly thankful to those who have fought in the past, and to those who will continue to fight to keep these lands available to all of us.

Not taking anything for granted.

Photo from Audubon Society of Portland

Photo from Audubon Society of Portland

Malheur matters.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Steigerwald, Birdathon, and Florida

They all have something in common I promise.

First Steigerwald.  Burrowing Owl reports showed up on eBird at this park and it’s not far from my house. Did someone say Burrowing Owl?! – pinch me, I’m dreaming. As soon as Tomas and I could inch through rush hour traffic and cross the river, we went to see if we could find the bird before sunset.

Where's owl

Luckily, we got there before the big cameras left because the owl was hard to find. The helpful photographers pointed it out to us. See it?

Where's Owldo?

Where’s Owldo?

Just the top of his head was visible above the rock. Here’s the best view we got that evening.

Burrowing Owl

I also saw a couple of the Say’s Phoebes hanging out nearby.

Say's Phoebe

And a pretty lake and stuff.

Redtail Lake

Since the park is so close, and owls are so cool, I went back the next morning to try for a better look at the burrowing fella. I bumped into a fellow birding friend when I arrived at the park gate, so we walked together.

On the way through the park, we crossed over the bridge and heard a splash underneath. And then several river otters (ridder odders!) climbed out onto a log to say hello.

River otter

River otter

They kept coming, until five popped out, then they all retreated under water and swam away. What an adorable surprise!

Little owly was slightly more cooperative this morning thanks to nearby Ring-necked Pheasants and an agitated American Robin.

Burrowing Owl

Things calmed down and the owl hunkered down again in the comfy concrete slabs.

Burrowing Owl

I love this bird. And unfortunately, it has attracted more attention, and folks aren’t giving it the space that it deserves. Getting too close, harassing, and even yelling at the bird? Who does that? Someone reported this to the local Fish and Wildlife Office, so hopefully the creeps stay away and don’t stress the owl.

The whole thing reminds me of the time I went looking for a specific owl and her owlets, and my conflicted feelings about encroaching on these creatures’ space for my own birding pleasure. How much is too much? Where is the line? Morals and ethics, people. Let’s all keep them in check, shall we?

Which brings me to Birdathon. It’s a simple way to give back, help Audubon educate the masses, and keep burrowing owls happy. I’ve joined the Put an Owl on It team again this year and good things are happening in June. I need to raise a minimum of $600, and you can help! Donate here.

Now a final stop at Florida, to thank my dad for his kind donation (!) and for documenting and sharing with me the most peculiar relationship between a Great Horned Owl and Blue Jay.

best buds

best buds

best buds

They are obviously best buds. The hopes of seeing stuff like this is why I leave my house. Cracks me up!

Tweets, chirps, and donations!

Audrey