5MR booms and busts

It’s fall! The air is cooler, the leaves are changing colors, and shorebirds are on their way back south. There are only three months left to find 5MR birds this year. Since I’ve last checked in, I’ve had a few hits and misses. Many of the hits were at a place in Portland with terrible visibility, Vanport Wetlands.

Dear City of Portland, please install a viewing platform. Love, birders.

Sometimes you have to take what you can get. Here, I’ve gotten poor looks at Lesser Yellowlegs, a Solitary Sandpiper, and a Sora foraging in the open about 100 yards away.

Sora or Sasquatch?

The best bird of the bad looks club here was a Ruff! First Vanport record, this one was found and kindly shared by Colby Neuman.

So Ruff

I’ve also gotten bad looks of good birds at Broughton, like this Whimbrel found by Jay Withgott. To the right of the Whimbrel is a Sanderling, believe it or not.

Bird pixels

On a whole I have been very lucky in my 5MR and I’m really appreciating that lately, especially when it starts pouring rain as I move closer in to take a photo of a Red-necked Grebe.

And a Common Tern floats down to the beach right in front of me.

When it rains, it pours

And three cheers for cooperative peeps that stick around like this amazing American Golden-Plover found by Aaron Beerman.

Aaron also pointed out a small flock of Horned Lark, I’ve been waiting all year to see these! They were all Streaked Horned Lark, a subspecies of Horned Lark, endemic to the Pacific Northwest and under threatened status.

Banded! – stay tuned to hear back about this one

So many booms! Where are the busts, you ask? Well, there were more than a few birds reported in my 5MR that I didn’t see in time: Baird’s Sandpiper, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Short-billed Dowitcher, Yellow-breasted Chat, Hermit Warbler, Red-necked Phalarope, Common Nighthawk. To name a few. There’s always next year? But, honestly I can’t complain because I’ve found many other great birds, including a Parasitic Jaeger at Broughton Beach.

Boom

No wait, not just one jaeger. THERE. WERE. TWO!

Boom Boom! Who needs a boat?

This was on the same day I saw a Merlin, a Wilson’s Snipe, and I got the best looks of a Common Tern.

For the most part, we birders are at the mercy of luck, timing, and making choices. Hopefully good ones because we can’t be everywhere at once. It feels nice to be in the right place at the right time and be rewarded with jaegers, terns, and plovers (oh, my!). Last I looked I was at 189 species in my 5MR, it’ll be pretty tough to make it to my imaginary goal of 200 by the end of the year, but either way I’m pretty happy with the birds I’ve seen so far.

Still missing: Red-shouldered Hawk, Northern Pygmy-Owl, American Dipper, Sandhill Crane, White-winged Scoter, Eared Grebe, Red-breasted Merganser, some wintering rarities (?)

Booms and busts,

Audrey

Fall Birding

Fall birding is blowing up. White-crowned and Golden-crowned Sparrows have returned to the yard singing “oh deear mee” making me so happy. I was also finally around to see a Red-breasted Sapsucker that I’ve only recorded in the yard once three years ago (!).

I might have jumped up and down. Or I would have except I’d had a little ankle setback after overdoing it on Mt Tabor. Not ready for steep hill-work yet I guess.

Luckily the hottest birding spot lately in Multnomah County, Force Lake, is a flat drive-up pond. Not known for being the best water system, past the “do not eat the fish” signs, the water levels have been favorable enough for a (usually pelagic) Red Phalarope. More typically Red-necked Phalarope occurs inland, but this molting adult bird has more red in the back and a thicker bill with (subtle bit of) yellow at the base.

I was also excited to find my FOS (first of season) White-throated Sparrow here mixed in between Golden-crowned Sparrows.

Less than a week later a new birder photographed (but misidentified) a Ruff at the pond. 7 months into birding I wouldn’t have been able to identify a Ruff either, but word got out about this significant sighting. Which is why I made several attempts to refind the bird. On my second try while scanning the far pond shoreline in near darkness I was rewarded with an even more rare bird, a Sharp-tailed Sandpiper!

Not great photos since it was so far and so dark, but the pale supercilium (eye-brow) and red cap is visible. It think it lit up in the darkness. And it’s not a Ruff because it has a smaller bill and is smaller than the Long-billed Dowitcher it’s standing next to.

This pond is bananas. It’s amazing what little it takes to support a good variety of species. And finally fifth time was the charm for finding the Ruff!

This time, at dawn I picked out the buffy shorebird in the scope as the sun came up. Early worm gets the bird.

Slightly larger than Lesser Yellowlegs

I put the word out and a handful of people made it to the pond to enjoy looks at the Ruff before two adult Peregrine Falcons swooped in scattering all the shorebirds while about 20 birders’ jaws dropped (in horror and amazement).

Incoming missile

The falcons hunted together cornering a LEYE but came up empty in the end. And that was the end of the Ruff show.

In other news, my dad’s moved to Newport, OR. Say what?! He said goodbye to Limpkins and Eastern Screech Owls and hello to Oregon’s coastal birds. I’m not sure that’s a fair trade.

Not fair. Photo by David Addison

I delivered some boxes to him, and together we looked for a Palm Warbler that was exciting to everyone in Newport except him (Florida is spoiled in Palm Warblers). It took a few tries, but eventually we found one.

What Florida doesn’t have is Lapland Longspurs and lucky for us we found one of those too at the gull pond at South Jetty. They nest in the arctic tundra and winter in open fields and beaches in some parts of Oregon. They are so pretty!

On the drive home from Newport I made three lazy attempts to find a Northern Shrike since this would put me at 295 Oregon birds for the year and for some reason I think it’ll be fun to try for 300 species. But I shriked out.

Luckily Sarah, Max, Eric and I took a trip to Fort Stevens State Park  the next day to look for a large flock of longspurs which we found easily when they flew.

And watched as they disappeared in the grass.

Expert camo

Occasionally they perched on the jetty rocks for better looks.

As we were leaving, Sarah spotted an accipiter perched across the grassy field. I saw a distant bird-lump too and was confused when she set the scope up in a different direction. Hmm. Wait. I took a distant photo and got excited when I realized this was a shrike! I only had to stop looking for them to find them. Oregon year bird #295! Northern Shrike.

This is a young bird as it’s darker than the bright white/black/gray of an adult. We walked the trail to get closer looks, and saw the shrike go after insects and dragonflies, and then it went for the Lapland Longspurs! Nooooo! It chased the flock unsuccessfully.

Until the flock chased it back.

Longspurs flying over.  Defeated shrike perched on shrub.

Fall birding, am I right? By late afternoon it was time to celebrate a good day of birding over beers and lunch. More of this please.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Oregon Shorebird Festival

This year I attended the 32nd annual Oregon Shorebird Festival in Charleston, OR. It’s a small two-day festival organized by by Harv Schubothe of the Cape Arago Audubon Society with presentations, dinner, and guided field trips around the Bandon, Charleston, and Coos Bay area.

It’s official

But before I got there, I took a detour to Newport to look for a reported Ruff near the Hatfield Marine Science Center. After a couple of tries, eventually I had success!

The last time I saw a Ruff it was just a blob on my photo so it was nice to finally appreciate one. Even if this young Western Gull didn’t.

The Ruff made friends with a Marbled Godwit.

And Black-bellied Plovers.

If this isn’t a shorebird festival I don’t know what is.

Three westerns and a Dunlin

Someone gave me a tip to look for Pacific-golden Plovers and Snowy Plovers at South Beach State Park nearby. The snowies were exactly where they were supposed to be hiding in little sand pockets (with Sanderlings).

The Pacific-golden Plovers on the other hand weren’t as cooperative. I gave it a solid effort, but after a few tries with no luck, I moved on. I still had two hours to drive before getting to Charleston.

Of course I also made a couple of stops to check for a Red Knot at the south jetty in Florence, but that was knot to be. Instead I found a pair of Marbled Godwits, and a close-up White-winged Scoter at the crab docks.

After too long on the road I finally made it to registration and “checked in” at the dorms. This was when I’d realized I made a terrible mistake. I thought I could sleep in the dorms at OIMB, but I’m just too light a sleeper. I could hear all the sounds, mostly because the dorm walls don’t even go to the ceiling.

One night with no sleep before field trips was fine, but two nights with no sleep before a pelagic trip was not going to happen. The next morning I groggily met up with the group to explore the Bandon area. We visited the South Jetty, China Creek, and Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge.

It was fun times with good people. I don’t have a ton of photos from the field trip since most of the day was foggy and overcast and a lot of the bird views were distant.

Watching Cassin’s Auklets a.k.a “flying potatoes” at Face Rock

The best birds were probably Snowy Plovers at Bandon Beach, Virginia Rails at Bandon Marsh marsh, and the Wandering Tattlers at South Jetty that popped up on the rocks when a mink ran by and spooked them.

Safe

I watched one of the presentations on photography by Tim Boyer, who had some great tips I’ll likely implement and who also has a helpful YouTube channel. The second night I slept great at Captain John’s Motel which is a good thing since the following morning I was meeting the group at 6:30am for what would be my fourth pelagic boat trip.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey