California – Dry Land

The pelagics were done! I was so relieved I’d made it out alive. And with new birds? Best case scenario. Now I had a day to look for more. I spent a lot of time at Lands End looking for a reported Parakeet Auklet.

Seen any auklets lately?

But it was nowhere to be found. I checked on the rocks down by the water, and was greeted by a friendly Black Oystercatcher instead.

Behind me in the bushes was this fun quiz bird. Answer at bottom.

Level: difficult

I watched a Pigeon Guillemot try to down a fish bigger than its head.

Before giving up on auklet dreams and moving on with my life. I didn’t move too far, about an hour south to Santa Cruz to look for a reliable Red-footed Booby. It’s favorite place is at the end of a pier next to this neat sunken war ship, the SS Palo Alto.

Like a mini Farallon Islands

I looked for a long while and asked around.

Seen any boobies lately?

But as it turns out, the booby broke its pattern and while we were standing in the place it was supposed to be, it was 20 minutes away, chilling on the beach with some gulls. Seriously, look at this checklist with the best Red-footed Booby pics.

I saw that report too late. But I still tried. I returned to the beach, and ran into Alex Rinkert, the birder who’d reported it! We exchanged contact info and with his encouragement, Tomas and I returned to the original pier to try again at sunset. Right on time, after staring at gulls for a while, Tomas said, is that it in the middle?

It wasn’t but then I looked at the bird to the right. There it was! Red-footed Booby!

It was after sunset and the light faded as we left happy it had all worked out. I thought it was a life-bird, but I forgot I’ve seen them in Hawaii. Oops. Clearly it’s been too long, and it was still totally worth it. We got a bonus Great Horned Owl as we drove back to Pacifica in the dark. No pics of that one.

The last few hours of California were spent looking at mudflats.

So many shorbs

I had time to look for one more lifer, a Ridgway’s Rail. They’re as sneaky as any rail and I wasn’t sure I could find one in time. I picked the wrong park first, Preserve Park, which was amazing, but huge. There was so much habitat and too many places for rails to hide.

I gave up, but not before seeing dozens of American Avocets.

Long-billed Curlew and Marbled Godwit.

Black-crowned Night Heron.

Black-necked Stilts.

It was very birdy but I made the executive decision to leave and try smaller Bayfront Park. And I’m so glad I did! Minutes after arriving I saw a chunky rail running away.

Ridgway’s Rail! (lifer #542).

It made it to a clump of grass and never came out again. And Tomas and I had just enough time to get ice cream before catching our flight back to Portland.

Fun times in California! From sea to land.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Quiz Answer: Lazuli Bunting

California- Farallon Islands

After such a successful pelagic the day before I was calmer the following morning.

This trip departed from Sausalito so we got to ride underneath the Golden Gate Bridge.

It started foggy, but things cleared up once a breeze kicked in. It was much easier to appreciate colorful Tufted Puffins.

And see the Shearwaters.

Shearwater journeys

As we made way to the Farallon Islands (Farall├│n in Spanish means “pilar” or “sea cliff”).

The Farallon Islands are a National Wildlife Refuge, not open to the public, but only to a few lucky researchers. These ridiculous islands have logged 377 bird species on eBird. We boated up to “sugar loaf” the island named for the sweet piles of bird poo on top.

There are mostly Brandt’s Cormorants, Common Murre, Pigeon Guillemots, Western Gulls, and the best bird could have been a long-staying Northern Gannet that lives at sugar loaf but the gannet wasn’t home this day. What the Farallons lacked in gannet they made up for with whale.

We saw probably 20 Humpback Whales at least.

Feeding with gulls and sea lions working together to trap anchovies.

It was one of the most incredible things I’ve seen. Video here. It was hard to pull away, but we had more birds to look at along the continental shelf and Pioneer Sea Canyon.

We saw Northern Fulmar.

Black-footed Albatross.

Cassin’s Auklets.

And the “rarest” bird of the trip, a Fork-tailed Storm Petrel.

Not a life bird, I’ve seen one on Oregon pelagics, but it’s been a while and it’s a good bird for California in the summer. It was the best looks I’ve gotten to date.

We turned around then, and when we got back to the bay it was a bright and sunny ride under the bridge.

A pretty nice way to end pelagic #2. That and no one on the ship got sick. I spent a total of 19 hours at sea in two days, saw two life birds, AND SURVIVED. Incredible.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Birdathon 2018

First, a big THANK YOU to my donators! I couldn’t raise money for the Audubon Society of Portland without you. This year I joined two teams, The Murre the Merrier and Brewery Blackbirds. The Murre the Merrier, led by Sarah Swanson and Max Smith was a 12-hour day, starting from the Pittock Mansion in Portland, continuing at the coast in the afternoon, and ending back at Dawson Creek in Hillsboro.

Colleen McMeadowlark

Birdathons are intense! We try to see as many species possible in a day and this time was no different. Some of the highlights included Purple Finch, Western Tanager, Wilson’s Warbler, and a FOY Western Wood-Pewee at Pittock Mansion.

Best view in the house

We stopped at Smith Homestead in the Tillamook Forest along Hwy 6 for Hermit Warbler, American Dipper, excellent sounds of Evening Grosbeak, and even better looks at perched Violet-green Swallows.

At the coast we visited Sitka Sedge State Natural Area, Oregon’s newest state park, that has an excellent trail through a saltwater marsh. We found Marsh Wren, Spotted Sandpiper, and two Black-bellied Plovers┬ádecked out in breeding plumage. We missed a normally reliable Wrentit, and instead got lovely looks at a Rufous Hummingbird that flashed us his golden gorget.

The perfect topper

We stopped for lunch at Sarah’s family beach house in Pacific City as we scoped Tufted Puffins on Cape Kiwanda’s Haystack Rock and watched a flock of Greater White-fronted Geese fly by.

We picked up a few other coastal species including Pigeon Guillemot and we made a special stop to add Common Murre (The Murre the Merrier!). While scoping birds a woman asked us what we were doing, and she was rewarded by having to take our group photo. So nice of her.

Back inland, after seeing no woodpeckers all day it was decided we’d end at Dawson Creek where Acorn Woodpeckers were a sure bet. And they were, along with Wood Duck, Yellow Warbler, Bewick’s Wren, and a FOY Olive-sided Flycatcher that brought our total species count for the day to 101! Great job team!

Saturday’s Brewery Blackbird Birdathon trip, led by Colleen McDaniel, was spent at Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge. This was a great day. The park promised baby Virginia Rails and it actually delivered!

Soak it in. Because it’ll never be seen out in the open again.

Other highlights included Lazuli Bunting, Black-headed Grosbeak, a singing Swainson’s Thrush, Willow Flycatcher, and the most cooperative Yellow-breasted Chat.

We saw Blue-winged Teal, Cinnamon Teal, and Green-winged Teal (teal slam!), and a Bald Eagle defy gravity while battling a Red-tailed Hawk. Quite the display.

Along the forest trail, Sarah spotted a Great Horned Owl surprisingly perched on an open maple branch. And another highlight was this Wood Duck family on a log.

Quite a handful!

After four hours we ended with 74 species. But because we’re good birders, we added a House Finch outside Stickman Brewery after pizza and beer bringing our total to 75.

Such good birders

Is May the best month for birding? It sure feels like it. So many great birds seen with great people! All for a great cause.

For the birds.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey