Eastward to Walla Walla

Last year, every bird was a life bird. By mid-February 2015 I had seen 77 new-to-me bird species. 77 lifers! I didn’t even know what a “lifer” was then. Over my first year birding, I saw 253 life birds. Not that I’m counting. But, yeah, I’m counting. So far this year I’ve seen 98 species (year birds), but only two lifers (more about one of those below). I now understand the significance. Perhaps I should have paced myself?

SeeAllTheBirds!

Nah. I’m okay with the bar set high. It’s made me a busy birder. In fact, I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t chasing red dots on Birdseye like a cat chasing laser lights since the first of the year. Last weekend, I drove four hours to southeastern Washington to catch some red dots along the Snake River.

Snake River

I caught a few at Hollebeke Habitat Management Unit. Like what I would call my first “obvious” Sharp-shinned Hawk (small head, skinny legs, square tail).

Sharp-shinned Hawk

Sharp-shinned Hawk

And (less obvious) Cooper’s Hawk below. I think.

Cooper's Hawk

Maybe that’s the same bird? There were at least a couple of each. I swear.

I also saw Dark-eyed Junco, Cedar Waxwing, Bald Eagles, American Coot, Northern Harrier, White-Crowned Sparrows, American Robin, Varied Thrush, and many Northern Flicker.

Northern Flicker

An American Kestrel with a snack.

American Kestrel

And Black-billed Magpie, both living and loud and tattered in pieces.

Black-billed Magpie

Wonder who the culprit was? At one point along the trail, I practically tripped over piles of pellets.

Pellets

Pellet

Yum

And whitewash? There was a little.

Whitewash

Then I looked up. Great Horned Owl!

Great Horned Owl

Hello handsome.

Great Horned Owl

I slunk away quietly to disturb as little as possible.

Continuing on I found a Northern Shrike!

Northern Shrike

And I saw one notable bird I recognized from my Florida trip, a Northern Mockingbird!
Apparently, a pretty good sighting for this location. Birder score.

Northern Mockingbird Northern Mockingbird

It was great birding all the birds on Hollebeke, but I still had found no life birds. I was kind of surprised. So, armed with knowledge from Scott Carpenter’s Nature Night series on owling, and hoping for new owls, I moved on to stare at willow thickets.

Willow thicket

I drove back and forth super slowly about 8-10 times for over an hour. I saw nothing. Eventually, nature called, and there are no restrooms in the middle of nowhere. I got out, went behind the thickets, and spooked four owls. Dang it! While falling over, I tried to take pictures of the blurry owl rockets.

Long-eared Owl Long-eared Owl

Judging by the barred tail in the first awful photo, these are indeed Long-eared Owls. Technically, a life bird! My first of 2016. But so bummed to spook them, I almost don’t want to count it. Almost. Hopefully I’ll get more opportunities to stare at willow thickets. Or next time I’ll wait until after sunset.

I wanted to check out Bennington Lake the next day, so I proceeded to nearby Walla Walla to stay for the night. If you have not heard comedian, Mike Birbiglia’s story of sleep walking while staying at La Quinta Inn (La Keen-TA Inn in Wahya Wahya Washginton), do yourself a favor and spend the next 7 minutes laughing at his story. I stayed in the room!!

Sleepwalk with me

Living the birder rock-n-roll lifestyle.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Vanport, Smith & Bybee, Ridgefield

One freezing day in January, I went on a bird-binge. It was mostly unintentional because I arrived at Vanport Wetlands to find the water frozen.

Geese on ice

Geese on ice

Then I went to Smith and Bybee Lakes and the water was frozen there too! I saw a fair amount of birds between the two locations despite the chilly temps, including a Downy Woodpecker that appeared frozen in place.

Downy Woodpecker

And Varied Thrushes.

Varied Thrush

I got to practice one of my 2016 goals: get better pictures of Golden and Ruby-crowned Kinglets. The best I could manage:

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

I still have a ways to go with those fast, wily birds.

Along the way, I even caught a glimpse of the local Great Horned Owl.

Great Horned Owl

Sleeping Yoda

And I saw other birds including Northern Pintail, Pileated Woodpecker, Song Sparrow, Brown Creeper…but the trip felt quiet and slow. I missed the early new-birder days when every bird was a new surprise. Nostalgia already?! I wanted more. It was late afternoon and considering options, I decided to try a third location, Ridgefield NWR.

It paid off.

Ridgefield NWR

Granted some lakes were still frozen, but the afternoon sun warmed and shone over the refuge. The birds and I both appreciated the relief from the dark, cold morning.

I got a better look at the Tundra Swans with the yellow “teardrop” at the base of the bill.

Tundra Swans

Happy Swans were happy.

Tundra Swan

Northern Harriers were hunting.

Northern Harrier

Northern Shovelers were shoveling.

Northern Shoveler

American Coots were…cooting? Okay, I’ll stop.

American Coot

I took some of my favorite pictures that day. I Finally caught the American Kestrel before it quickly flew off.

American Kestrel

Here’s a few more favorites of a Cackling Goose, Great Blue Heron, Gadwall and Savannah Sparrow.

Cackling Goose

IMG_6925

IMG_6993

DPP_33015

Savannah Sparrow

Still pretty common birds, but I was thrilled. And maybe a little delirious from the sunshine. It’s been a wet winter.

Here are a few more.

My time at Ridgefield definitely made the day and scratched that birding itch. Wouldn’t you agree?

Savannah Sparrow

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

P.S. #Support Malheur

Steigerwald and Warblers!

A week ago, my boyfriend Tomas joined me on one of my best birding trips yet.

I was hesitant to try out Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge before the seasonal trails open (May-Nov), but it was totally worth going. The park is a picturesque 1,049 acre setting of pastures, woodlands, and wetlands along the Columbia River with plenty to see and explore without the seasonal spur.

Upon entering the trail system, we got a great look at a Northern Harrier. Who can resist that charming flat owl-like face?

Northern Harrier

Northern Harrier

Northern Harrier

Following the trail, we came across a flash of feathers near the water’s edge. I investigated further to find an American Bittern!

American Bittern

Moving slowly and steadily, the bittern was on the prowl for a tasty bite of breakfast.

American Bittern

Not long after this, I saw my first migratory warbler! A Common Yellowthroat!

Common Yellowthroat

And after that, I saw a bunch more!

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

So dang cute. They were up, down, flying all around, singing, and “warbling” adorably. It took patience to get photos, but I even managed a single shot of a female.

Common Yellowthroat female

Later, a passerby alerted me to this handsome fella dabbling in the pond.

Cinnamon Teal

A Cinnamon Teal, what a treat!

Cinnamon Teal

Stigerwald turned up plentiful wildlife for us to see.

One of my favorite pictures of the day is of this Ring-necked Pheasant. He has a beautiful sunset-colored chest. A much better view than my first encounter on Sauvie Island. This bird was cackling loudly and making a fuss.

Ring-necked Pheasant

Perhaps he was displaying for his nearby lady friend.

Ring-necked Pheasant

We left Steigerwald grateful for such a fulfilling visit. Even so, on the drive home I yelled for Tomas to pull over so we could get a look at Osprey nesting aside Highway 14, because why not?

Osprey

Later, this same day, my dad emailed me a picture of an Osprey he saw in his hometown of Largo, Florida. While seen only in summer in Oregon, these fierce beauties frequent his neighborhood ponds year-round. What a charismatic shot!

Osprey

April birding is off to a great start!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey