Florida: Boyd Hill Nature Preserve and Lake Seminole Park

Last Florida post! In the final days of my trip, my dad and I visited a couple of local city parks, one in St. Petersburg called Boyd Hill Nature Preserve. This park reminded me of Texas parks; there’s an admission fee, set hours (nature is closed on Mondays), a gift shop, and even an optional tram service. Aside from all that there’s marsh, swamp, oaks, and scrubland goodness that winds 6 miles through trails and boardwalks.

There’s also an aviary with rehabbed birds where I saw my only Eastern Screech Owl of the trip. Nice squinty face.

My dad and I walked the trails dodging troops of singing children and searched for what birds we could find. There’d be long stretches of quiet, and then a bustle of birds would turn up.

The biggest showing was on one single bush. I would love to know what kind of plant this is (Sideroxylon salicifolium, willow-bustic, white bully?). It hosted Yellow-rumped Warbler.

Followed by:

Palm Warbler

Blue-headed Vireo

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Antcatcher)

Pine Warbler and Downy Woodpecker (trust me).

Also a Northern Cardinal and Carolina Wren, followed by my only Carolina Chickadee of the trip.

And here I had my first sighting of a Tufted Titmouse.

10 species in one bush all at once! It was incredible.

Tufted Titmice show up, and all of a sudden they multiply and many more call a scratchy “tsee-tsee-tsee,” as they gather together in the treetops then all disappear again.

I think around this point I mentioned I hadn’t seen a Black-and-white Warbler yet on the trip, and voilà, one showed up!

If only it always worked like that.

We had a good Pileated-Red-bellied Woodpecker combo.

And the end of a boardwalk that led us to this perfect Anhinga statue.

I’m so happy this exists. Good job Boyd Hill Nature Preserve.

Moving on to my dad’s local patch in Seminole, FL, Lake Seminole Park, where first thing in the morning I had a blurry lifer Monk Parakeet flyover.

Still counts

We then found a great pair of Purple Gallinule. A young brown one.

And a purple adult.

By then it was time to say goodbye to some of Florida’s best birds.

Northern Cardinal

Little Blue Heron

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Osprey

Noisy nutty Blue Jay

We had another warbler flurry that included Yellow-throated Warbler.

Prairie Warbler.

And Pine Warbler.

In the shrubs we coaxed out a Brown Thrasher.

And passed a “soon to be flying squirrel.” Good one, dad.

Mushrooms were clearly in bloom.

I noted a White Peacock butterfly.

And drug my feet leaving the park. We finally called it a day when we found a Wood Stork that hadn’t been there moments before.

Hanging with his friend, Great Egret. It was one of those classic Florida birding moments that I’ve grown to love (and miss!). Until next time, Florida!

See you later alligator.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Florida: Circle B Bar Reserve I

My dad and I birded almost every day on this trip. It’s nice he shares a fondness of feathers. And since last time I left without finding Limpkins, this time he took time scouting parks for potential. He found Circle B Bar Reserve.

Located in Lakeland, FL, the former cattle ranch is over 1200 acres of now protected wildlife reserve home to more than 220 species of birds. Not to mention the alligators, bobcats, armadillos, otters, foxes, insects, reptiles, and 45 butterfly species. It’s part of the East Section of the Great Florida Birding Trail, a 2000-mile collection of protected spaces.

We made three trips to this park in six days and each time we found something new.

It’s glorious. And also a popular destination for photographers (check out the Flickr page).

On our first visit, just a few feet down the trail as I scanned for birds, all of a sudden Limpkins, Limpkins, Limpkins!!!

Not just Limpkins, BABY Limpkins!

I think my exact words were, “OMG baby Limpkins, are you kidding me?”

Limpkins’ main source of food is apple snails, and they are found in abundance here. Florida apple snails are the only native snail, but several invasives have moved in, including the island apple snail, wrecking havoc on wetland crops and the ecosystem, but creating a great food source for Limpkins. They also have the potential to help the endangered Snail Kite (one bird we missed).

Bubblegum or snail eggs?

Where food is plentiful, so are babies. Even in November apparently.

My dad and I watched mama Limpkin break open the apple snail to feed the little Limpkin chick. It was so amazing to watch.

Eventually I pulled myself away from the Limpkins long enough to admire other birds, like plentiful Black-bellied Whistling Ducks.

Including Black-bellied Whistling ducklings. Awwww.

And baby Wood Storks. Awwww?

Wood Storks are great, to feed, they balance one wing out while swirling their feet in the water stirring up good stuff.

So clever.

Another lifer common at the park was the Glossy Ibis.

So glossy

Different from the White-faced Ibis I’ve seen in southeastern Oregon because of its dark iris and pale lines on its face.

Tri-colored Herons coasted by.

Cattle Egrets scarfed down grasshoppers.

And Anhinga juggled fish. Birds here are so talented.

While watching this Anhinga toss fish like pizza dough I looked down and caught a glimpse of movement. Hey!

Sneaky snipe

Wilson’s Snipe! A great spot. It’s important to keep your eyes open, you never know when something will sneak up on you, it could have been this guy.

Hey, I recognize that hump.

We never got a look at its face but I’m pretty sure I heard a low growl rumble from those waters. Check out this video of it crossing the path. So big!

The only thing we saw crossing the trail were tiny birds like this Little Blue Heron.

And a turtle (peninsula cooter?) that stopped for a moment to lay eggs.

The real treat came when we turned around on the trail and something bright yellow caught my eye.

Hello Yellow-throated Warbler! What a beauty. Captivated we followed the busy warbler while it pried leaves open and searched the moss for tiny insects.

A treat for the warbler and a treat for us. This park was so great!

More Circle B birds to come.

Tweets, chirps, and Limpkins,

Audrey

Thanksgiving in Florida: Yard Birds

This year I spent Thanksgiving in Florida visiting family and squeezing in as much birding as possible. Luckily, Florida makes that pretty easy. I visited two years ago and gained a new respect for birds I didn’t appreciate while growing up in the Sunshine State and I was excited to return and find more critters.

Takes specialized training, don’t try this at home

My mom lives in Tampa near the University of South Florida, Lettuce Lake Park, and a small but productive pond right next to the house. She would have a pretty bad-ass 5 mi-radius if she wanted. Two years ago, her yard produced my lifer Black-throated Green Warbler, and this time it gave me a lifer Prairie Warbler!

Blurry, but there’s a bright yellow chest and throat, dark streaks on the sides, olive back yellow eye crescents, and black eye-line. I refound it the next day to try for better photos.

So much better

This bird was tough to get! The best I could manage:

One easy warbler to find is the Palm Warbler.

They’re everywhere with that yellow undertail continually wagging.

Another easy find was Eastern Phoebe always calling “Fee-bee!

And Brown Thrashers, another great southern yard bird.

And of course, the ever ubiquitous, Northern Mockingbird.

I am any bird and all birds

One morning I heard a tussle of raspy high-pitched trills that turned out to be a NOMO street fight.

An Eastern Gray Squirrel and I watched safely from the sidelines.

Cheap seats

Closer to the pond I found a juvenile Little Blue Heron.

Almost all white with a hint of light blue coming in. Makes me wonder what evolutionary advantage having white followed by blue feathers could be? Curious.

Nearby I caught a quick glimpse of one of my favorite birds, the Gray Catbird.

And higher up in the trees were gobs of Blue-gray Gnatcatchers.

It’s funny to think how popular the one gnatcatcher in Portland was, when there are so many here, but that’s the fun of rarities.

Other birds I saw were Common Yellowthroat, Yellow-rumped Warbler, and bubbly House Wren.

Wren of the house

I heard a Carolina Wren singing before I finally spotted it deep in the shrubs.

And I saw another iconic yard bird, the Northern Cardinal.

I happily eye-balled all these birds I haven’t seen in so long, then noticed a bunch of  raucous Blue Jays.

And realized I wasn’t the only one eye-balling them. Cooper’s Hawk!

Fun stuff, I could spend days enjoying the yard birds, but we had to check into the condo on the beach the next day.

Many more Florida birds to come!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey