Bonus zono

I birded so efficiently at the coast it left me ample time the next day to look for a rare Harris’s Sparrow. It was a first-year bird found by James Cook along Sundial Loop Trail near the Troutdale Airport.

It’d been a while since I birded this hotspot. My first trip in the spring of 2015 I biked there and saw my first Rufous Hummingbird and found a Great Horned Owl nest. That was a good day.

I checked on that nest again and sadly this time, no owls.

This morning it was dark and rainy but I was hopeful anyways. I came across two birders on the trail that I’ve met before and we reintroduced ourselves. Dena Turner and Mary Ratcliff and I then continued along, looking for “zonos” birder slang for Zonotrichia, the genus of five American sparrows included in the Emberizidae family; White-crowned Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow, Golden-crowned Sparrow, Rufous-collared Sparrow, and Harris’s Sparrow (Zonotrichia querula).

Zonotrichia is from Greek origin, zone “band” and thrix, trikhos, “hair.”

Golden-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla)

I could see that.

Querula is Latin for “plaintive” or “complaining” in reference to the Harris’s song.  And while we’re going there, Harris’s Sparrow is named after Edward Harris (1799-1863), (not the actor), but ornithologist and friend of Jonn James Audubon.

Unfortunately, the morning resulted in zero zonos. But we did see some Lesser Goldfinch or maybe call them “spins,” short for Spinus?

Of course as soon as I got home, someone reported the Harris’s Sparrow. *face-palm* And at this point, Tomas had taken the car to go mountain biking. What was a good birder to do? Since it was my last chance before the work week started again and I’d have no time to bird, I grabbed a Car2Go rental and headed back. It was only a 20-minute drive from my house, and I figured, I’ve spent more on a bird before. Justified.

Within minutes of exiting the car, I saw my friend, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher Bill and another birder on site, and moments later I was on the bird.

Zono friend!

The Harris’s Sparrow hopped to the ground to munch on seeds that someone put out for the birds (thanks for that!).

Two other zonos were present, White-crowned Sparrow (no photos), and Golden-Crowned Sparrows.

I got a glimpse overhead of a Pileated Woodpecker that I’d only heard earlier.

And every once in a while a California Scrub-Jay would drop in and stir up all ground-feeders.

Dark-eyed Juncos scattered.

Spotted Towhees didn’t care much.

And eventually the handsome Harris’s would come back.

He was an ambassador for wildlife after all.

I was so glad I’d gone back! It was worth every penny.

Tweets and zonos,

Audrey

Texas: Salineño to The End

The last couple of days in Texas began with finding as many birds as possible at the Harlingen Thicket.

This meant hanging with Harris’s Hawks.

Watching Great Kiskadees collect nesting material.

And finally getting a good look at a Tropical Kingbird (best distinguished by Couch’s by voice).

One bird I was thrilled to get even a b-rated photo of was the White-eyed Vireo. I had too many missed photo-ops with this one.

There were few target birds we hadn’t seen by now. The nemeses of the trip, if you will, would have to be a small kingfisher, the Green Kingfisher, and Verdin, a bird that looks like a Bushtit with a yellow head. Several near misses, but we didn’t find either of these at the thicket either.

But we did see Texas Spiny Lizards humping.

And giant spiders.

It was late afternoon at this point and time for Sarah, Max, and Eric to catch their flight back to Portland. We bid them farewell and figured out our next plan. Jen and I had one more day to explore and we aimed to make the most of it. We drove two hours west to Salineño, a tiny town of Texas along the Rio Grande with a population of only 201 people.

We didn’t see any people (not even border patrol), but we did see plenty of birds, including three specialties, the Red-billed Pigeon, White-collared Seedeater, and Audubon’s Oriole. We thought the pigeons would be difficult, but they were actually quite easy.

Pretty perched pigeons.

We saw another intriguing bird perched farther in the distance, a Gray Hawk!

Worth crossing the scrubby desert full of ticks for a closer look.

Along the way we saw the White-collared Seedeater, a species that had a sharp population decline in the mid-70s, but has recently made a slight rebound.

Glad we got a look at this hard working bird.

Hiking farther along the dunes we passed Olive Sparrows.

And the “Texas form” Lesser Goldfinch that has way more black than other varieties.

I also heard a slow whistled song that perked me right up (I recognized it from the movie!), the Audubon’s Oriole! The only one we saw of the entire trip.

We also got a quick fly-by from a Green Kingfisher and I got terribly blurry photos of a Verdin. Not satisfactory sightings, but they happened. Another thing that happened was the Gray Hawk flew right by us next to the river.

This was a special place. And more like the birding trips I’m used to, wandering around bumping into all sorts of great new birds. We had such a fun time exploring, but at some point we knew it was time to make the long drive back to San Antonio to catch our plane home. Of course we stopped along the way.

For my last Scissor-tailed flycatcher of the trip. And the best views of a Pyrrhuloxia.

A stop for nesting Cave Swallows.

And for all the dead things (including a bobcat *cries*).

The best stop was for Jen to save this turtle from crossing the big, mean highway.

Texas was incredible. I saw an 72 lifers! And had the best time with a bunch of birders gone wild.

There’s no better way to party.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

February birds cont’d

A majority of my February was spent obsessively looking for screech owls on Mt Tabor. I made about a dozen trips at various early-morning and late-night hours but all I could come up with is a lone Barred Owl calling early one the morning.


 
My search continues.

Outside my five mile radius, however at Oak’s Bottom I struck gold.

Or silver actually. While hiking, I happened to notice a slightly silver feather pattern peeking out of the side of a tree that I was about 85% sure was an owl. I was confident enough to return at sunset to see what happens after dark.

Oaks Bottom at sunset

Sure enough.

Right on cue just after sunset, a sleepy Western Screech Owl peeked its head out! It’s the first one I’ve found on my own. And only the third I’ve ever seen. The first was at this exact park (in a different tree) two years ago on a Birdathon trip. It’s quite possible this is the same owl, or that owl’s partner.

Minutes later as the sky darkened, the owl woke up and looked out further.

I had brought Tomas along with me and together we watched this incredible creature wake up and survey its surroundings. Not wanting to disturb it, we decided to leave before it exited the trunk.

Just as we turned around it flew out over our heads and perched on a low shrub nearby. It called it’s ping-pong call for a few minutes (and another owl nearby responded!) before it then darted into the darkness to hunt. We were ecstatic as we hiked out.

Then Tomas said – look!

It was right next to us along the trail! So tiny, about the size of a soda can. In the dark we could barely keep track as it flew down to the water, and we heard a splash as it caught something (a fish?), then we quickly lost track again. I felt incredibly lucky.

A daylight search on Mt Tabor turned up Fox Sparrow, Red-breasted Sapsucker, and Band-tailed Pigeon to add to my 5MR.

Welcome back pigeon

And on a trip to Broughton Beach I found Brewer’s Blackbird, Horned Grebe, Killdeer, and one early morning I was lucky to find a flock of Horned Lark.

Back at home one rainy day I birded from our bedroom window and managed to see an American Goldfinch hanging with the Lesser Goldfinch.

Sometimes it’s nice to bird from bed when it’s so dreary outside.

Lesser Goldfinch

From the window I also saw a rare sight of two Anna’s Hummingbirds at the feeder at once. That never happens.

And did I mention my Townsend’s Warbler is back?

They sure do make these rainy days brighter.

Lights me up every time. Hope things dry out soon! Marching on to spring…

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey