Birthday Birds

This year for my birthday I went on a day trip to the coast with my friends Sarah, Eric, and Jen. We hoped to see “Mr. Costa,” the Costa’s Hummingbird that visits Eric Horvath’s residence in Newport. Costa’s hummingbirds typically prefer Sonoran and Mojave Deserts, chaparral and sage scrub areas along the California coast, but for some reason, this little one likes Eric’s house instead. Lucky guy.

This is the same spot Jen and I unsuccessfully tried in March when the bird was in immature plumage, but it was back now in bright purple breeding plumage, giving us extra incentive to try again. We piled into the car and made way to the coast through rainstorms, sunshine, and occasional rainbows.

Along the way, we kept our eyes on the power lines looking for Tropical Kingbirds, but no luck. We stopped at Boiler Bay Viewpoint to see if any of the floating kelp might turn into auklets, no luck there either, but Sarah did spot fly-by Black Scoter; orange knobby bill, black wing-tips.

We arrived at Eric’s house next, and thanks to his generosity we saw a hummingbird three of us had never seen before, and in such an unusual place for Costa’s.

Happy birthday to me! Costa’s Hummingbird, lifer #450.

Costa’s, Blue-footed Booby combo

We watched Mr. Costa vigorously chatter and defend the feeder from resident Anna’s Hummingbirds. True to hummingbird form, he’s a feisty little bird.

Feeling pretty relaxed we enjoyed Eric’s other yard birds.

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Townsend’s Warbler

Hermit Thrush

We spent as much time as politely possible watching the Costa before finally saying our goodbyes. Walking back to the car down the street we stopped at Yaquina Bay just in time to see the Bald Eagle stir up the waterfowl.

And on the opposite side of the street in a marshy wetland, Sarah found me a state Virginia Rail! No visuals on this secretive bird (of course), but we heard the piggy-like grunt, “wep, wep, wepwepppprrr.”

And farther down the road…Red-shouldered Hawk!

We’d just been talking about these hawks, then it appeared. While in the area, we also visited the South Jetty and nearby Hatfield Marine Science Center estuary trails where we found other “red” birds.

Red-throated Loon (with that droopy neck)

Red-breasted Merganser

Red-necked Grebe

And we also found a nice surprise of five Marbled Godwits along the HMSC trails.

Overall, it was a fantastic birdy-birthday trip to the coast.

Despite the dramatic skies an occasional gull showers.

And I made it home to find Tomas had bought me banana cake and beer. The best of times! Cheers to another year of good birding and good friends.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Springtime Birds

Back home from Texas and it’s spring in Portland? I’m okay with that.

My 5 mi radius has blown up lately. The evening before I left for Texas, a Rufous Hummingbird paid our feeder a visit.  First time for the yard!

And on a more recent morning, I found an unlucky Anna’s Hummingbird knocked out on our doorstep (I think after a territory dispute). It was barely alive and a tragic find. But with Tomas’s help and a little warmth and sugar-water, the little guy bounced back a little and got a second chance. Tomas wrote a heartfelt post about the experience.

In other yard news, after a big wind storm a couple of weeks ago, I noticed a metal box-lid lifted on a contraption next to the garage door.

Inside I found a nest!

Not knowing if it was viable or not, I waited and checked back a week later.

Three more eggs! I had assumed they were likely House Finch (based on size, color and nest location), but after checking on the nest tonight, I accidentally spooked mama-bird.

It’s a Bewick’s Wren nest! So exciting. She picked a high-traffic spot, but we will have to make a point to give her space. Love our backyard birds.

Also this month I spent some time at Broughton Beach after reading reports of a reliable Red-throated Loon. Unfortunately, on my first attempt I ended up loon-less.

And soaking wet after a huge rainstorm. But just before the downpour I found an American Pipit.

And a Savannah Sparrow! I’ve missed them at the beach.

So it was all rainbows.

And the following morning I returned and successfully located the loon! So easy.

X’s 2 when a second loon flew by! Doubly reliable! A few other lucky flybys at Broughton included a Cliff Swallow.

An Osprey carrying nesting materials.

And a flock of unmistakable American White Pelicans.

More good finds were had nearby at Whitaker Ponds, including an Orange-crowned Warbler.

And the most amazing looks of Black-throated Gray Warblers.

More warblers, yes, please. Mt Tabor Park happily oblidged. Plenty more Orange-crowned Warblers.

And FOY Nashville Warblers! Hooray!

I also officially identified a Purple Finch singing on top of a high perch. A good clue to ID was it sounded like a warbler. It’s a long over-due life-bird and a solid 5mi radius species. Hopefully I’ll get better visuals in the future.

I also played hide-and-seek with a Hermit Thrush. And lost.

But I won a Pacific-slope Flycatcher when it popped into my binocular view.

And a small surprise flock of Evening Grosbeak.

There’s something about their warm, striking color pattern that blows my mind.

I’m so happy it’s springtime! Bring on the flowers, sunshine, and birds!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Epic Summer Trip Part II: Mt Adams

After a night of camping near Conboy Lake NWR, I was ready for more exploring. I drove along the border of the refuge toward my next destination. There was very little traffic early morning in Glenwood, Wa., and it’s a good thing because I stopped in the middle of the road when I saw this “chicken”!

Ruffed Grouse

A little closer.

Ruffed Grouse

Closer.

Ruffed Grouse

Even closer.

Ruffed Grouse

I inched closer still until the Ruffed Grouse hopped on a nearby tree branch and stared at me. Nice start!

Ruffed Grouse

Later on, I pulled over when I noticed bird drama in a field along the road. Turns out there was a dead “item of desire” in the field attracting Turkey Vultures and a couple of Bald Eagles.

Turkey Vulture

Bald Eagle

The cows were displeased.

Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

And they proceeded to chase the eagles. I only wish I’d recorded the action on video. Such greatness.

Our national bird chased by bovine.

Our national bird chased by bovine.

I left Glenwood on route through the tiny town of Trout Lake, eventually ending the day on a remote logging road in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest near Mt Adams.

Mt Adams

Peace and quiet

I dodged the heat, enjoyed some solitude, and caught sight of a few birds including Pine Siskin, Hermit Thrush (that performed the distinctive tail lift), and Western Tanager.

Pine Siskin

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Western Tanager

Western Tanager (female)

It was a lovely spot to end a day after the scorching heat.

Lovely

But wait, there’s more!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey