Springtime Birds

Back home from Texas and it’s spring in Portland? I’m okay with that.

My 5 mi radius has blown up lately. The evening before I left for Texas, a Rufous Hummingbird paid our feeder a visit.  First time for the yard!

And on a more recent morning, I found an unlucky Anna’s Hummingbird knocked out on our doorstep (I think after a territory dispute). It was barely alive and a tragic find. But with Tomas’s help and a little warmth and sugar-water, the little guy bounced back a little and got a second chance. Tomas wrote a heartfelt post about the experience.

In other yard news, after a big wind storm a couple of weeks ago, I noticed a metal box-lid lifted on a contraption next to the garage door.

Inside I found a nest!

Not knowing if it was viable or not, I waited and checked back a week later.

Three more eggs! I had assumed they were likely House Finch (based on size, color and nest location), but after checking on the nest tonight, I accidentally spooked mama-bird.

It’s a Bewick’s Wren nest! So exciting. She picked a high-traffic spot, but we will have to make a point to give her space. Love our backyard birds.

Also this month I spent some time at Broughton Beach after reading reports of a reliable Red-throated Loon. Unfortunately, on my first attempt I ended up loon-less.

And soaking wet after a huge rainstorm. But just before the downpour I found an American Pipit.

And a Savannah Sparrow! I’ve missed them at the beach.

So it was all rainbows.

And the following morning I returned and successfully located the loon! So easy.

X’s 2 when a second loon flew by! Doubly reliable! A few other lucky flybys at Broughton included a Cliff Swallow.

An Osprey carrying nesting materials.

And a flock of unmistakable American White Pelicans.

More good finds were had nearby at Whitaker Ponds, including an Orange-crowned Warbler.

And the most amazing looks of Black-throated Gray Warblers.

More warblers, yes, please. Mt Tabor Park happily oblidged. Plenty more Orange-crowned Warblers.

And FOY Nashville Warblers! Hooray!

I also officially identified a Purple Finch singing on top of a high perch. A good clue to ID was it sounded like a warbler. It’s a long over-due life-bird and a solid 5mi radius species. Hopefully I’ll get better visuals in the future.

I also played hide-and-seek with a Hermit Thrush. And lost.

But I won a Pacific-slope Flycatcher when it popped into my binocular view.

And a small surprise flock of Evening Grosbeak.

There’s something about their warm, striking color pattern that blows my mind.

I’m so happy it’s springtime! Bring on the flowers, sunshine, and birds!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Epic Summer Trip Part II: Mt Adams

After a night of camping near Conboy Lake NWR, I was ready for more exploring. I drove along the border of the refuge toward my next destination. There was very little traffic early morning in Glenwood, Wa., and it’s a good thing because I stopped in the middle of the road when I saw this “chicken”!

Ruffed Grouse

A little closer.

Ruffed Grouse

Closer.

Ruffed Grouse

Even closer.

Ruffed Grouse

I inched closer still until the Ruffed Grouse hopped on a nearby tree branch and stared at me. Nice start!

Ruffed Grouse

Later on, I pulled over when I noticed bird drama in a field along the road. Turns out there was a dead “item of desire” in the field attracting Turkey Vultures and a couple of Bald Eagles.

Turkey Vulture

Bald Eagle

The cows were displeased.

Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

And they proceeded to chase the eagles. I only wish I’d recorded the action on video. Such greatness.

Our national bird chased by bovine.

Our national bird chased by bovine.

I left Glenwood on route through the tiny town of Trout Lake, eventually ending the day on a remote logging road in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest near Mt Adams.

Mt Adams

Peace and quiet

I dodged the heat, enjoyed some solitude, and caught sight of a few birds including Pine Siskin, Hermit Thrush (that performed the distinctive tail lift), and Western Tanager.

Pine Siskin

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Western Tanager

Western Tanager (female)

It was a lovely spot to end a day after the scorching heat.

Lovely

But wait, there’s more!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Shillapoo and Frenchman’s Bar

As soon as I typed “breakfast burrito” into the search bar, that’s when the magic happened.

Let me back up.

Some time passed since I last visited Shillapoo National Wildlife Refuge so I decided to give it another go. Part of what makes birding fun is visiting regular haunts and seeing different birds each time. Indeed, I saw some newbies this trip.

Like this Lazuli Bunting.

Lazuli Bunting

And from blue head to the Brown-headed Cowbird. A bizarre thing I read about these birds is they lay eggs in other bird’s nests instead of making their own. A strategy known as “brood parasitism.” Some birds, like the Yellow Warbler, evolved to recognize the imposter eggs, but because the bird is too small to remove the eggs it builds a new nest on top, hoping the cowbird doesn’t return. It’s a tough nesting world out there.

Brown-headed Cowbird

Another competitive nester and loud vocalist I saw this day, the House Wren.

House Wren

House Wren

I was entertained for while by this Anna’s Humbingbird. So much so, I took a video. I love that flashy face.

Anna's Hummingbird

Anna's Hummingbird

Also fun was watching the Common Yellowthroat twitter around in the cattails.

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

The park was alive with yellow birds, like these American Goldfinch.

American Goldfinch

How many do you see?

How many do you see?

I’ll be honest, there was one yellow bird I had hoped to find this day, the Yellow Warbler. There are lots of yellow warblers, but there is only one Yellow Warbler. I thought I might see one at Shillapoo, but no luck, so I headed to nearby Frenchman’s Bar Park since I saw a sighting posted on E-bird the day prior. I headed out.

I saw a couple of tricky birds I had to look up.

Orange-crowned Warbler

Broken eye ring, greyish head, drab-yellow underneath = Orange-crowned Warbler

Western Tanager

Drab olive head, dusky grey back, light wing bars = female Western Tanager

Also noteworthy at this sight is the Osprey nest visible from the beach.

Osprey

Osprey

Osprey

A few other birds I saw.

Spotted Towhee

Spotted Towhee

Pileated Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker

Warbling Vireo

Warbling Vireo

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

This brings me back to my burrito. By this point it was getting late in the morning and I was thinking of leaving. Though I’d seen so much, I was sort of bummed to miss out on the Yellow Warbler. While second-breakfast was on my mind, I glanced up from my phone, and this happened.

Bullock's Oriole

I did a double-take. It’s not yellow, but it’s a bright orange bird! I’ll take it! Squee! My heart raced as I watched and followed the Bullock’s Oriole pair around the park. It was such a great sighting I had trouble pulling myself away. What burrito?

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey