GD Part III: Arcata

There is a lot to love about Arcata.

The small-town feel, lush surrounding forests, beautiful ocean views.

Arcata Mural

While I birded, Tomas explored nearby redwood forests by mountain bike. Arcata Community Forest is kind of like Portland’s Forest Park, but with fewer people and more hills. Bonus.

Mountain bike

When not birding or biking we ate yummy bagels at Los Bagels and drank beer at the local brewery. I also spent time admiring nature murals around town.

Taking a picture

Mural

One free afternoon I wandered around until I ended up at Woodley Island Marina on Humboldt Bay. Like you do. Here I got good looks of a few waterbirds.

Common Loon

Common Loon in breeding plumage. Oooooh, ahhhhh

Western Grebe

Western Grebe (Western Gull photo bomb)

Eared Grebe

Eared Grebe

And I finally had some quality alone time with shorebirds. Like the Marbled Godwit!

Marbled Godwit

What took me so long? It’s GODWIT Days. Here’s another!

Marbled Godwit

And here’s one next to a Willet!

Godwit and a willet

Honestly, I hadn’t seen a Willet since my Florida trip, so long ago that I forgot what they looked like. This trip was a good refresher.

Willet

Another (rougher looking) Willet

And here’s a Godwit with an upside down bill and a hat! Oh, no, wait. That’s a Whimbrel. New bird!

Whimbrel

Not a Godwit

I also saw Caspian Tern on the shore and a couple hunting from the air. Terns are always entertaining.

Caspian Tern

Later in the day, Tomas and I decided to return to the Arcata Marsh together. Quite a few good birds were on the scene.

Snowy Egret (look at that foot!)

Snowy Egret (look at that foot!)

Great Egret

Great Egret

Long-billed Dowitcher

Long-billed Dowitcher

Red-shouldered Hawk

Red-shouldered Hawk

Green-winged Teal

Green-winged Teal

Ruddy Duck

Ruddy Duck, nice bill!

Just before we left, we came across this crazy looking bird.

Black-crowned Night Heron

A closer look at the chunky, red-eyed bird.

Black-crowned Night Heron

A juvenile Black-crowned Night Heron! We noticed adults perched nearby obscured by bushes. Good bird finds at the marsh!

Two out of four evenings on this trip, Tomas and I spent staring at old barns.

barn

Because that’s how couples spend romantic evenings together, right? Yes, yes it is. And rumor on  V St. Loop was that Barn Owls like to join the party. The first night we stared at the wrong barn, but the second night we got it right. Two hours before sunset we were in place and ready.

Where is the owl?

Where is the owl?

While we waited, a variety of birds entertained us.

Barn Swallow

Barn Swallows swarmed the abandoned houses

A pair of Greater Yellowlegs happen to be in a field nearby

A pair of Greater Yellowlegs happened to be in a nearby field

Brewer's Blackbird (female)

Brewer’s Blackbird (female)

The Brewer’s Blackbirds were the best distractions.

Brewer's Blackbird

Brewer’s Blackbird

I hadn’t noticed before, but they scrunch themselves in a puffy ball and kind of wind themselves up before they “sing” a short tchup or chuk. Wish I’d taken a video. (Here’s someone else’s video of one in a parking lot.)

The other bird that was fun to watch was the White-tailed Kite.

White-tailed Kite

White-tailed Kite

White-tailed Kite

My pictures don’t do it justice. I think local student Hanalee Hayes’s drawing is way better.

Kidlet Art

I had only seen one before on a recent trip to Tillamook, and now I’d seen three in a matter of days (four if you count this drawing). Winning at birding.

Things quieted down, and the sun set.

V-street Sunset

Moments later in the darkness an owl flew from the barn. Right on schedule. First Barn Owl of the year! Second in my life! So awesome! And totally worth the wait.

Barn Owl

It immediately set out hunting, caught something (presumed rodent), and returned to the barn. Not long after, it left again and flew over the field in front of us, and to our surprise, shrieked it’s hissing call, “cssssshhH!” Amazing.

We watched until it was so dark our eyes could barely focus as it flew off over hills far away. So good.

There is much to love about Arcata.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Godwit Days Part II: Birding with Sibley

Just when you think birding life can’t get any better, you go on a trip with David Sibley.

Pay no attention to that shirt.

Pay no attention to that shirt.

He is just as awesome as you think. Son of Yale University ornithologist Fred Sibley, David began watching and drawing birds at age seven. He’s an author (of my favorite bird guide), illustrator, ornithologist, and a down-to-earth nice guy. His favorite birds to draw are warblers. I tried to keep my inner fan-girl in check. (squeee!)

Birding with Sibley

We birded the Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary a.k.a. Arcata’s Wastewater Treatment Plant. It’s actually a pretty ingenious system. Part recreation, research, refuge, and part wastewater. Keeping it classy.

Arcata Marsh

The variety of sanctuary habitat is key for birds in this area: freshwater marshes, salt marsh, tidal sloughs, grassy uplands, mudflats, brackish marsh, ponds, etc. Shorebirds especially love it, but the first bird on this trip that caught our attention was the highly vocal Marsh Wren.

Marsh Wren

Sibley explained, though currently considered one species, Marsh Wren populations in the western U.S. are probably a separate species from the eastern populations because of the differences in songs (the eastern birds have about 50 “musical” songs, the western up to 200 “harsh” songs), and their slight variation of appearances.

We continued scanning the marsh and saw a White-tailed Kite, Yellow-rumped Warblers, and a spring of Green-winged Teal. One teal stood out to Sibley as an “intergrade” with both a vertical white bar of the American subspecies, and the horizontal white bar of the Eurasian subspecies.

Intergrade Teal

Half a lifer

In another pond were American Coot, Gadwall, Eared Grebe, and Lesser Scaup. One unusually light-colored scaup was identified as a leucistic female Lesser Scaup. “Leucistic” is partial loss of pigmentation (not to be confused with albinism, a total absence of melanin).

Leucistic Scaup (far left)

Leucistic scaup (far left), normal scaup (far right), Bufflehead in the middle

Apparently, odd-ball birds show up when Sibley is around.

He has a profound scientific understanding the natural world around him. We watched the Least Sandpipers at the edge of the pond, while he described how hormones determine the melanin differences between the birds’ feathers.

The bird on the far left has more greyish-whitish edges on its feathers (like winter plumage), and the others have more rufous color and black in the centers of the feathers (closer to breeding plumage), therefore with more breeding hormones. Swoon.

Least Sandpiper

And these birds are Long-billed Dowitchers (not Short-billed) because they are sitting in a freshwater, non-tidal, muddy-bottom lagoon.

DPP_779

Sibley-vision

Sibley-vision is no joke

After lunch near the end of the trip, we spent some time watching a pair of Red Crossbills before finally moving on to book signing and gushing.

So much cheese. Photo thanks to Lee Brown.

So much cheese. Thanks to Lee Brown for the photo.

Sibley Signing

Good birding!

Audrey

Commonwealth Lake Park and Cedar Mill Wetlands

Aside from Moody’s bill, my trip to Commonwealth Lake Park last weekend was fantastic. Bird-word on the street is that Green Herons nest here, plus, this spot is close to Cedar Mill Wetlands where the BirdsEye app shows a Rufous Hummingbird visited two days prior (!!).

The first bird I saw though, was a warbler!

Orange-crowned Warbler

The uniform yellow-green color, sharp pointy bill, and invisible orange crown leads to Orange-crowned Warbler! Super cute in a non-descript sort of way.

The park was thriving with Yellow-rumped Warblers as well, and now I realize, as my birder-mentor and friend, Laura Whittemore, pointed out, some are a little different than others I’ve seen before this trip.

Yellow-throat:

Yellow-rumped Warbler Audubon's

Not yellow throat!

Yellow-rumped Warbler Myrtle

Yellow-rumped Warbler Myrtle

Yellow-rumped Warbler Myrtle

All are Yellow-rumped Warblers, however there are two varieties: Audubon’s Warbler that has the yellow throat, and the Myrtle Warbler that has a white throat, white eye-stripe, and contrasting cheek. According to Wikipedia, the two populations likely diverged during the last ice age. Nowadays, these abundant warblers are considered “conspecific” or belonging to the same species. Who doesn’t love challenging warbler identification?

An easy ID was this Green Heron. So dang thrilling.

Green Heron

few other birds I saw at Commonwealth Lake Park included Barn Swallows (that nested under the small lake dock!), Great Egret, and Mallard (with a chick!).

I then traveled to Cedar Mill Wetlands with the hopes of a Rufous encounter – spoiler alert, while I was flashed briefly by what I think was an orange-red gorget of the Rufous Hummingbird, I didn’t get another look or photo to confirm.

I did, however, get pictures of Green-winged Teal, Gadwall, Northern Shoveler, Spotted Towhee, Red-breasted Sapsucker, Song Sparrow, lovey-dovey Mourning Doves, and a few other birds.

Acutally I think the lovey-doves deserve more attention. Maybe put on some soft music, light some candles, viewer discretion advised, kids.

Mourning Doves

Mourning Doves

Mourning Doves

Mourning Doves

So Tweet!

Audrey