Texas: Bentsen-Rio Grande Valley SP

Our first visit to Bentsen-Rio Grande Valley State Park was so much fun in the dark with Elf Owls we knew it would be great in the daylight too. We were right. This park has a lot going on with 760-acres of riparian woodlands in the floodplains of the Rio Grande.  Accessible by bike, walking, or by catching a tram shuttle. The park is awesome. But we showed up a little early and it wasn’t officially open yet.

Common Pauraque calls lured us closer (and we caught a brief glance of the Elf Owls again too before they disappeared). So we went in. Then found and figured out the Honor Box system so we could continue further into the park without fear of the Border Patrol.

First ones in the park get to see the Bobcat!

Woah! Jen spotted this one prowling near the boatramp at Kingfisher Overlook. First time I’ve gotten such a good look at one. It seemed pretty spooked by us and quickly disappeared into the forest. So amazing.

If a bobcat could be around this corner what could be around the next? We continued walking as a flock of 30+ Anhinga flew over our heads.

Then Max heard an intriguing “tee-tee-tee-tee-tee” that turned out to be one of the coolest named birds ever, the Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet (Ty-rann-u-let). Sounds like a dinosaur, right? It’s actually a small flycactcher lacking bristles at the base of its bill. Not that my photo makes it very clear.

We also saw a lovely Green Jay.

A Great Kiskadee.

And a Couch’s Kingbird saving us from stingy-bitey things.

Then we turned around another corner and heard the saddest dove ever. Eric said, “That dove is beyond mourning.” Then Sarah looked up and said, “That is an odd-shaped hawk.” We were all wrong because it was a Greater Roadrunner!

Way up in the tree it bent over and called the saddest call ever. Here is a short clip. I hope his sad song helped him find a mate to cheer him up.

I was tickled by this sighting. On my wish-list of bird sightings was a roadrunner and this experience blew anything I could have imagined away. Amazing stuff.

Eventually we made our way to the Hawk Observation Tower.

It was slow at first, we saw sunlit hawk-specs in the distance. But eventually a few flew in closer. A helpful volunteer park staff explained how to distinguish Broad-winged Hawk from Gray Hawk.

Broad-winged are slightly darker underneath with a dark edge along the end of the primaries. Finally one Broad-winged Hawk came close enough to demonstrate.

Unfortunately, no Gray Hawks came by for comparison (at least that I saw). There was a kettle of hawks in the distance but most were Broad-winged. Still a pretty cool sight.

After hawk-watching we made our way back to the main feeders. Passing The Great Wall of Chubby Lizards along the way.

So chubby.

At this point, in the heat of the day, we plopped down on swinging chairs to rest and watch birds at the bird-feeders (short video). It was mainly a Plain Chachalaca parade.

Is it just me or do chachalacas always look displeased?

Why so angry? Giving the stink-eye.

Actually they remind me more of Beaker from The Muppet Show.

Amiright? Totally related.

Haha. Too far? I’m sorry chachalacas, I apologize. You’re so regal.

We had one more surprise at the feeders. A bright orange surprise.

Winner for best orange cheeks goes to the Altamira Oriole!

What a beauty! Bentsen State Park did not disappoint. Great surprises around every corner.

After this it was time for post-birding tacos before more birding!

Birders gone wild,

Audrey

Texas: Estero to Bentsen

The next morning Jen and I left the cabins at 3am because that’s normal. Actually it’s the opposite of normal, but it’s an excellent way to make good time driving when you aren’t distracted by birds along the way. We had to drive 6 hours south to pick up the rest of the spring-break birding crew from the Brownsville airport.

So efficient. Until daylight broke and we immediately pulled over by the first Scissor-tailed Flycatcher! This one’s named Rudolph.

We arrived in Brownsville with enough time to make a quick stop near the airport at Dean Porter Park. Here we saw Neotropic Cormorants (that look similar to Double-crested Cormorants), Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, Golden-fronted Woodpecker, lifer after lifer after lifer.

We also saw some familiar faces.

Black-necked Stilt

White Ibis

“You can’t see me” -Muscovy Duck

And I had way to much fun entertained by Great-tailed Grackles.

And Laughing Gulls. I’m especially fond of gulls that are easy to ID.

No question you are hilarious.

We made it to the airport in time to pick up Sarah, Max and Eric. They’d flown in on a red-eye and we’d been up since 3am. We were all ready to bird. A quick stop at the Airbnb to drop off luggage and we arrived at Estero Llano Grande State Park to meet up with Jen’s Texas buddy, Nate and his friend from Austin, AJ.

Compared to PacNW parks, the “World Birding Centers” of Texas are a bit different. They are more maintained, usually have feeders, operation hours, and moderate entry fees. It’s all worth it. Upon entry we were immediately overwhelmed at the feeders when Eric got his lifer Northern Cardinal.

Then I got my lifer Curve-billed Thrasher.

Then we all (minus the Texans) got lifer Chachalacas!

These dinosaur-like birds are Plain Chachalacas (Cha-cha-la-cas). Fun to say and fun to watch. They are “the only member of the family of guans, currasows, and chachalacas to reach the United States.” They are big and loud.

Then before you know it, they melt into the forest and disappear.

Bye-bye Cha-chas. Hello Buff-bellied Hummingbird!

We then scanned the pond area and found Little Blue Heron, White-faced Ibis, Stilt Sandpiper, Lesser Yellowlegs, Blue-winged, Cinnamon, and Green Teal (teal trifecta).

Watch where you’re pointing that thing

At another pond we met the Least Grebe.

That eye.

Then Nate led us to another part of the park to see a Common Pauraque.

Or not see it. Where bird?

Best camo ever.

This place was ridiculous.

AYFKM?

Just as we left Estero, my lifer Long-billed Thrasher bid us farewell. Lifers around every corner.

We filled up on tacos at Nana’s Taqueria before heading to our final destination of the day, Bentsen-Rio Grande Valley State Park. Rumor was there was a possible Elf Owl nesting site there. We arrived just before sundown.

Just in time to squeeze in a Ringed Kingfisher sighting.

Before gathering with 18 other hopeful birders to stare at a hole in a telephone pole.

Cheap seats

Just after dark to everyone’s glee a tiny owl popped out from the forest and perched on a nearby wire. Not long after a second owl appeared and then they both disappeared in darkness. Some imagination needed to see this one:

Maybe not the most glamorous sighting, but nevertheless it was a suberb way to end the day. Walking back to the car we watched bats and fireflies and listened to Common Paraque zip around in the sky catching bugs calling “purr-WEEE-eer.”

Only in Texas.

Birders gone wild,

Audrey