Steigerwald

I took a trip to Steigerwald Lake NWR to see what the Purple Martins were up to.

They were busy being birds.

Purple Martin

I love listening to them chatter. Wonder what they’re saying?…

I was a bit confused by their plumage. In fact, while taking these photos, another birder on the path asked me what kind of birds they were and I wasn’t positive they were all martins.

Purple Martin

Purple Martin

A little Googling reveals that, like some birds, Purple Martins have “delayed plumage maturation” and it takes two years for their adult plumage to come in. So, some of these could be subadult males. That explains their plumage.

But what explains their attitude?

Purple Martin

More obvious males were visible at the nesting “gourds“.

Purple Martin

Purple Martin

Purple Martins, the largest North American swallows, migrate from South America (Brazil, Argentina, Peru) and feed on large insects like dragonflies. 40 nesting gourds are maintained at Steigerwald that had a successful 90% occupancy rate in 2014 according to USFWS. Nice to know they have a place to nest here.

Other species seen on this trip:

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Shillapoo and Frenchman’s Bar

As soon as I typed “breakfast burrito” into the search bar, that’s when the magic happened.

Let me back up.

Some time passed since I last visited Shillapoo National Wildlife Refuge so I decided to give it another go. Part of what makes birding fun is visiting regular haunts and seeing different birds each time. Indeed, I saw some newbies this trip.

Like this Lazuli Bunting.

Lazuli Bunting

And from blue head to the Brown-headed Cowbird. A bizarre thing I read about these birds is they lay eggs in other bird’s nests instead of making their own. A strategy known as “brood parasitism.” Some birds, like the Yellow Warbler, evolved to recognize the imposter eggs, but because the bird is too small to remove the eggs it builds a new nest on top, hoping the cowbird doesn’t return. It’s a tough nesting world out there.

Brown-headed Cowbird

Another competitive nester and loud vocalist I saw this day, the House Wren.

House Wren

House Wren

I was entertained for while by this Anna’s Humbingbird. So much so, I took a video. I love that flashy face.

Anna's Hummingbird

Anna's Hummingbird

Also fun was watching the Common Yellowthroat twitter around in the cattails.

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

The park was alive with yellow birds, like these American Goldfinch.

American Goldfinch

How many do you see?

How many do you see?

I’ll be honest, there was one yellow bird I had hoped to find this day, the Yellow Warbler. There are lots of yellow warblers, but there is only one Yellow Warbler. I thought I might see one at Shillapoo, but no luck, so I headed to nearby Frenchman’s Bar Park since I saw a sighting posted on E-bird the day prior. I headed out.

I saw a couple of tricky birds I had to look up.

Orange-crowned Warbler

Broken eye ring, greyish head, drab-yellow underneath = Orange-crowned Warbler

Western Tanager

Drab olive head, dusky grey back, light wing bars = female Western Tanager

Also noteworthy at this sight is the Osprey nest visible from the beach.

Osprey

Osprey

Osprey

A few other birds I saw.

Spotted Towhee

Spotted Towhee

Pileated Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker

Warbling Vireo

Warbling Vireo

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

This brings me back to my burrito. By this point it was getting late in the morning and I was thinking of leaving. Though I’d seen so much, I was sort of bummed to miss out on the Yellow Warbler. While second-breakfast was on my mind, I glanced up from my phone, and this happened.

Bullock's Oriole

I did a double-take. It’s not yellow, but it’s a bright orange bird! I’ll take it! Squee! My heart raced as I watched and followed the Bullock’s Oriole pair around the park. It was such a great sighting I had trouble pulling myself away. What burrito?

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Steigerwald and Warblers!

A week ago, my boyfriend Tomas joined me on one of my best birding trips yet.

I was hesitant to try out Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge before the seasonal trails open (May-Nov), but it was totally worth going. The park is a picturesque 1,049 acre setting of pastures, woodlands, and wetlands along the Columbia River with plenty to see and explore without the seasonal spur.

Upon entering the trail system, we got a great look at a Northern Harrier. Who can resist that charming flat owl-like face?

Northern Harrier

Northern Harrier

Northern Harrier

Following the trail, we came across a flash of feathers near the water’s edge. I investigated further to find an American Bittern!

American Bittern

Moving slowly and steadily, the bittern was on the prowl for a tasty bite of breakfast.

American Bittern

Not long after this, I saw my first migratory warbler! A Common Yellowthroat!

Common Yellowthroat

And after that, I saw a bunch more!

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

So dang cute. They were up, down, flying all around, singing, and “warbling” adorably. It took patience to get photos, but I even managed a single shot of a female.

Common Yellowthroat female

Later, a passerby alerted me to this handsome fella dabbling in the pond.

Cinnamon Teal

A Cinnamon Teal, what a treat!

Cinnamon Teal

Stigerwald turned up plentiful wildlife for us to see.

One of my favorite pictures of the day is of this Ring-necked Pheasant. He has a beautiful sunset-colored chest. A much better view than my first encounter on Sauvie Island. This bird was cackling loudly and making a fuss.

Ring-necked Pheasant

Perhaps he was displaying for his nearby lady friend.

Ring-necked Pheasant

We left Steigerwald grateful for such a fulfilling visit. Even so, on the drive home I yelled for Tomas to pull over so we could get a look at Osprey nesting aside Highway 14, because why not?

Osprey

Later, this same day, my dad emailed me a picture of an Osprey he saw in his hometown of Largo, Florida. While seen only in summer in Oregon, these fierce beauties frequent his neighborhood ponds year-round. What a charismatic shot!

Osprey

April birding is off to a great start!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey