An excellent week of birds

It started when I left work early one day to find a rare Snowy Egret in the Vancouver Lake Lowlands that was associating with a Great Egret and Mallard decoy.

Also present were Greater Yellowlegs, a couple of hardy Tree and Barn Swallows, and Purple Finch, a year bird I was happy to see lower in the branches.

On the way out a flash of black and white caught my eye.

Ah, yes. Migration was in full swing as Snow Geese, Cackling Geese, and Sandhill Cranes came and went. I pulled over to take a look.

It was hard to pull myself away.

The following weekend I was excited to join Sarah and Max for some Oregon county birding. We went south on I-5 to Talking Waters Gardens, a place I’ve never birded before located in Linn County.

It was fantastic water treatment-wetland habitat full of American Wigeon, Hooded Merganser, Virginia Rails, and even one vocal Sora (my first Oregon Sora!). No visuals of the Sora, unfortunately, but we did locate three Black Phoebe.

1/3 phoebes

 Several Lincoln Sparrows.

And a moderately cooperative White-throated Sparrow hanging out in a corner of the ponds.

It was still early in the day when we completed the trails so we drove north making a quick stop at Waverly Park where we found a couple of Western Gulls and a FOY Green Heron. Then it was onward to Ankeny National Wildlife to (officially) add birds in Marion County which included distant Dusky Canada Geese with red neck collars.

And muddy-faced swans.

Not making it easy to ID

Luckily there were a couple with visible yellow lores helping to confidently ID them as the more expected, Tundra Swans.

We also stopped at the Rail Trail on the refuge to walk on a boardwalk through Oregon Ash wetlands.

The water was so high it reminded me a bit of Florida’s wetlands but without the moss and humidity. Along the trail we found more Black Phoebe, White-breasted Nuthatch, Downy Woodpecker, and Max heard a Red-breasted Sapsucker that we eventually spotted right at the water’s edge.

Not something you see every day.

The next morning I got up before dawn to chase a sea duck. There’d been a report of a female Steller’s Eider at Seaside Cove on the Oregon coast but I had an appointment with a tree-trimmer at 12:30pm so I didn’t have any time to waste. I left the house at 5am and arrived at Seaside when it was still dark. Luckily, there were already two birders there making me feel totally normal.

One was Trent Bray, avid birder and shop owner of Bobolink, a birding (disc golf, and beer) supply store in La Grande, Oregon. Trent had left La Grande at 1am that morning but it paid off because he already had the bird in the scope. We watched it dive and ride the waves drifting out farther as more birders arrived on scene.

The bird became harder to locate in the waves and we felt a bit bummed. But then the eider flew right back to us. Hooray!

What a good duck. We all cheered and took hundreds of photos. The blocky head, the pale eye-ring, and two white wing bars were clearly visible on this first-winter female bird. She was cooperative, clearly not minding the attention. Or the surfers.

Surfer, surfer, eider, scoter combo

Steller’s Eiders are listed as threatened and rarely found outside of Alaska. This is only Oregon’s fourth record.

I was giddy and thrilled I’d taken time to come visit her. And because it was so easy, I had at least 10 more minutes to look for a Palm Warbler at a nearby water treatment plant (thanks for the tip, Sarah!).

Success! I found it with minimal difficulty though it didn’t want to be seen. A warbler less cooperative than a rare sea duck, go figure. Running out of time I dashed the two hours home and made it within minutes of meeting the arborist. Winning.

Not far from the house on another day I found the Greater White-fronted Geese frequenting the golf course by Force Lake, and in a tree next to the parking lot a Sharp-shinned Hawk practicing being ferocious.

This one had perfected the stink-eye.

And on another local outing at Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge I attempted to find a Red-shouldered Hawk. I’d unknowingly walked right by it until I spotted a Red-tailed Hawk that ignited the fire in the Red-shouldered and it vocalized loudly and chased its competition away.

Birding has been good to me this month. To say the least. Next month might be a different story, but more about that later. Until then, I’m enjoying everything I can get!

And that includes my FOY-yard Townsend’s Warbler!

Back and cute as ever.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Seattle to Malheur to Astoria II

I stayed two nights in the historic Frenchglen Hotel. Established in 1916, the hotel has interesting history and rustic charm. The rooms are small and the bathrooms shared, but I was most excited for the family dining experience. I’m not usually into family dining, but in this setting I found it delightful and charming.

Dinner is promptly served at 6:30pm and consisted of tasty local fare followed by apple cobbler for dessert. While grazing, Tomas and I chatted with another Portland couple visiting in a similar fashion to us, but the best part was listening to stories from the retired couple at the opposite end of the table about their encounters earlier in the day with wild horses and burrowing owls. I listened carefully.

And the next morning when Tomas set off for his bike tour over Steens Mountain, I set off in search of owls.

Love that guy

The plan was Tomas would bike tour for a week while I birded the surrounding area so I could also provide a pick-up if needed. Best of both worlds. We set off and though I tried hard, searching the shrubs along gravel roads, checking multiple sites, I failed to find any owls.

But I did find Golden Eagles.

It was neat to see the different variations, the one on the left with white patches under the wings and tail is a juvenile. I pulled over at another stop and saw four (!) perched on a power pole in the far distance. See terrible photo evidence (note the American Kestrel perched on the juniper to the right):

One big happy family

While driving around I spooked several birds along the roadsides, occasionally finding a cooperative one or two perched on barbed wire.

Sage Thrashers

Western Meadowlark

Brewer’s Sparrow

Vesper Sparrow

And waiting to strike, Loggerhead Shrike.

It was exciting to get roadside views of pronghorn.

Butt, butt, pronghorn

Classic eastern Oregon.

And not far away, hopeful coyote.

After too many hours of driving, I returned to Frenchglen and discovered the P Ranch historic area of Malheur. Named after Peter French, a nineteenth century rancher, the P ranch is now a part of Malheur National Wildlife. Old structures, barns, fields, and paths along the Donner und Blitzen River, it was really pretty and I spent some time poking around and finding a few birds including:

Yellow-breasted Chat

Song Sparrow

Yellow Warbler

White-crowned Sparrow

Being in Malheur, I really wanted to find something exotic. Because Maheur, right? I got pretty excited when I saw this weirdo bird.

It took me a while to realize it was just an American Goldfinch in transition to non-breeding plumage. Then another point I got excited when I saw something I thought looked grouse-like in a field.

Not until I got home and studied the photo when I realized it must be an American Kestrel in a chicken suit. Strike two. Birding is hard.

Lets look at deer instead.

Better. At least I recognized one bird.

Bank Swallow! Hanging on the wire next to with a bunch of Barn Swallows and the moon.

As it got dark, Common Nighthawks flew by peenting along the way as I made my way back to the hotel room for the last night. In the morning, I would head to Steens Mountain to see what I could find.

Good nights and chirps,

Audrey

Hits and misses at Broughton Beach

This summer has been rough at Broughton Beach. Early in the season, in hopes of a reported Least Sandpiper, I thought a quick stop after work would do. But when I arrived…

No birds. Just big crowds of people. Big miss.

Undeterred, I returned the following Saturday at 5:30am when I knew there’d be fewer people.

Early morning scritches

So far so good. Nobody there but early birds eating crayfish.

I peeked around and found many juvenile birds, like this Savannah Sparrow.

White-crowned Sparrow.

And Dark-eyed Junco.

Hello baby bird season (aka stripey, streaky, weird-looking birds). It never gets old. Right, European Starlings?

I made it to the gull roost and back to the parking lot without finding any peeps. I was kind of bummed, and this was when I also realized I’d lost my keys. Ugh. Major fail. I texted Tomas for rescue and proceeded to retrace my steps. At least I could look for more birds in the mean time.

I made it all the way back to the gull roost, when wouldn’t you know it, Least Sandpiper! Warm brown colored, slightly drooping bill, yellow legs. Yay!

At least there was that, I thought. And even better, halfway back to the parking lot, in the tall grass I found my keys! Thank goodness for bright orange wristbands. Major relief.

The next trip to Broughton was even better. Right as I got out of the car, I spotted a coyote in the parking lot!

I grabbed my camera and followed from a distance watching the bold canine trot right out along the multi-use path.

Multi-use indeed.

Also on this trip, I watched an Osprey swoop down to the beach gathering nesting materials.

After picking out the best clump of sea-stuff, it returned to the nesting platform out in the Columbia.

Also in the air were other flying things.

And one more that I was really excited to find, a bird I’ve only seen one other time on a Birdathon Trip last year, Bank Swallow!

I’ve barely learned this bird, identifiable by that dark band across the chest that extends down the middle. They also have a different flight pattern than other swallows, flying low over water with quick, fluttery wingbeats.

Least Sandpipers (L) were back! And they brought their friend Western Sandpiper along (R) this time.

Moderately long droopy bill, gray-rufous back, and black legs.

Later, just as I was getting to the car to leave, I heard another surprise, the raspy grating call that could only be a tern. I looked up to see, sure enough, a Caspian Tern!

The final and biggest hit at Broughton was a peep that Jen alerted me to. I couldn’t go on that day, but I told her to tell it to stay put. It worked because the next day I checked it was still there!

Baird’s Sandpiper! A mf lifebird as it turns out. It was the only peep on the shore, and it was so cooperative. It ran by my feet several times.

We were besties. I got great looks as it ran around the beach. Even as it picked up a moth.

And smashed it! Whack!

Good job, lifebird. And why is this a Baird’s Sandpiper? Because of the fairly long slightly drooping bill, distinct stripey chest markings, black legs, and especially because of the long wings that extend beyond the tail.

Or up in the air.

But more about shorebird ID later.

So many good finds at Broughton Beach!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey