Kennewick, WA

Not long after birding Vancouver Lake, Tomas and I packed up the car for a return trip to southeastern Washington. I felt like there was more to be seen along the Snake River than the weekend before. I was right.

On the drive there (and back) we saw Bighorn Sheep! A first for both of us. My best photo taken from the car going 60 mph along I-84 on the Oregon side.

Bighorn Sheep

The weather was cold, rainy, and windy, so unfortunately camping was out.  Instead, we stayed at Clover Island Inn, which is situated on an island on the Columbia River. I thought it might get me closer to birds on the river, but I’m not sure I would recommend staying there, it’s kind of dumpy. And rather creepy.

Hotel twilight zone captured by Tomas.

Hotel twilight zone captured by Tomas.

The only birds I saw from the hotel were Horned Grebes, American Coots, Canada Geese, Song Sparrow, Yellow-rumped Warbler, and gulls. The hotel’s most redeeming quality is that it’s within walking distance to Ice Harbor Brewery.

Geese

Geese on way to the pub

The party really picked up along the Snake River. We stopped at every park, from Hood Park to Fishhook Park, and back to McNary National Wildlife Refuge.

We saw Red-tailed Hawks, Bald Eagles, and Killdeer.

Red-tailed Hawk

Bald Eagle

Killdeer

And I met the angriest owl ever.

Murder

Murder

I’m pretty sure this one’s responsible for several deaths. Including that of at least one Barn Owl. So pretty, so sad. R.I.P. Mr Owl.

Barn Owl feather

Barn Owl leg

We also met an owl that I’m sure wouldn’t hurt a fly. Maybe a small mouse, but not a fly.

Northern Saw-whet Owl

My first Northern Saw-whet Owl!!! So cute!

Murder

Murder

Once the owl high wore off, I came to and noticed a few other birds. Including a new finch!

Cassin's Finch

Cassin's Finch

Cassin's Finch

Cassin's Finch

These are tough. They are either Purple or Cassin’s Finch (I am open to suggestions). Even Whatbird couldn’t agree. Female/juvenile Purple Finch have a distinctive face pattern, strong/blurry streaking on sides and chest, and a shorter bill. Cassin’s streaks are crisper, their beaks are longer with straighter sides, and they have a thin white eye ring. Male CAFI are raspberry red on top, PUFI can be rosy below the crown.

To make matters more interesting, in some parts of Washington both species will flock together. And House Finch will join in the fun too.

HOFI on left, CAFI/PUFI on right

HOFI on left, CAFI/PUFI on right

The more I see them the more I know what to look for. One unmistakable species we came across was a flock of California Quail.

California Quail

California Quail

Too bad I couldn’t get better pictures, they’re so pretty! There were at least 20 of them scurrying in the underbrush calling, clucking, and “pit-pit“-ing alarm calls. These birds have some fantastic sounds.

At McNary NWR, we stopped for a reported Black-crowned Night-Heron and American White Pelican. No luck on the night-heron, but while Tomas sat in the warm, comfy car he spotted the pelican sitting below a Great Blue Heron rookery! Great find!

American White Pelican

Meanwhile, I fought the wind and shrubs and came up with a Marsh Wren. Not bad either.

Marsh Wren

What an awesome trip. On the drive home we even made time for a quick hike at Coyote Wall, the land of sunshine, waterfalls, and rainbows.

Coyote Wall

Doggy

Yep, afterwards we were that content.

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey

Vancouver Lake

It’s been a while since I’ve seen a new sparrow. Certainly not for lack of trying. Since before the first of this year, I’ve looked for little brown birds with that extra bit of flair at several locations including Jackson Bottom, Fernhill Wetlands, Ridgefield NWR, Sauvie Island, and Vancouver Lake. But still no luck.

So when I saw White-throated Sparrows were a target species for one of Audubon’s free outings a couple of weeks ago I was pumped. We met early at Vancouver Lake on a day forecast for steady rain showers.

Audubon outing

The lake waters started slow, a couple of Double-crested Cormorants flew by, and Cackling Geese flew overhead, and then things picked up with thousands of Snow Geese, multiple Sandhill Cranes, and a pair of Tundra Swans passing by above.

Audubon outing

Walking along the trails increased our species sightings with Western Meadowlark, Fox Sparrows, White-breasted Nuthatch, Pacific Wren, Red-winged Blackbird, Great Blue Heron, Great Egret, and American Kestrel. To name a few.

Audubon outing

Walking back on the park roads that’s when the sparrow magic happened.

White-throated Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

Not just a pile of leaves, there’s a White-Throated Sparrow in there!  There were a few hopping around and kicking leaves within the groups of Golden-Crowned Sparrows and Dark-eyed Juncos. Success! Sometimes it helps to have more eyes and a seasoned guide to find the bird.

Oddly, on this trip I took more pictures of people than birds even though we saw more than 50 species! It was not the greatest light conditions, but with no rain AND a new sparrow? I call that a good day.

Audrey

Eastward to Walla Walla, part II

Day 2 in Walla Walla I arrived at Bennignton Lake early enough to see the sky full of stars and to hear a Great Horned Owl pair hooting, “Who’s awake? Me toooo.

Bennington Lake

The trail system is fantastic. 20 miles wind through 600 acres of woodlands and meadows surrounding the lake. The lake was set up by the US Army Corps of Engineers for flood control in the 1940s.

One section of trail is referred to as “owl alley” by local Audubon members because of the frequent owl sightings. I was hoping to find one or two. Upon researching, I learned long-eared owls nest in the park and there were recent ebird sightings, “one did not flush and sat nicely for great views!” I could only imagine.

I saw Killdeer on the lake shore, and mergansers and geese on the lake. In the hardwood forests Downy Woodpeckers and Northern Flickers were busy collecting insects. Dark-eyed Juncos, White-crowned Sparrow, and Bewick’s Wrens were singing their hearts out. Does this mean it’s spring already?

Dark-eyed Junco

White-crowned Sparrow

Bewick's Wren

I saw the Mountain Chickadee sporting the white eye-stripe!

Mountain Chickadee

And the Northern Harrier hunting, as per usual.

Northern Harrier

I found a row of pines that looked pretty owly. Sure enough, pellets, bones, and whitewash littered the ground.

Pellets

Pellets

But, alas, no owls were home. Or if they were, they were invisible. That’s probably more like it. Still, it felt good to practice tracking skills.

Upon leaving the park, I saw a Townsend’s Solitaire absorbing BTUs from a solar panel.

Townsend's Solitaire

Then I heard a soft, faint hooting. I was all over it and scoured the trees until I found them.

Great Horned Owl

Yeah! Two Great Horned Owls! (One in the lower left). These must be the two I heard earlier near the parking lot when I arrived. Good times at the lake.

Great Horned Owl

On the drive home I got some good looks of my other bird love (and last year’s obsession), the Western Meadowlark.

Western Meadowlark

Western Meadowlark

Western Meadowlark

And just because, I made a quick stop at Balch Lake, past Lyle, Washington. The lake provides habitat for the protected pond turtle, and is also home to dozens of Lewis’s Woodpeckers!

Lewis's Woodpecker

Lewis's Woodpecker

Lewis's Woodpecker

These fellas are highly entertaining and I’d recommend checking out this site for some great looks. I’ve heard there is also an Acorn Woodpecker granary nearby, but I’ve yet to find it. Yet.

Can’t get enough!

Tweets and chirps,

Audrey